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1970 




1958 




Taylor University was organized in 1846 
in Fort Wayne, Indiana and was called the 
Fort Wayne Female College. The name of 
"Taylor University" was endowed upon this 
college in 1890, in honor of the missionary 
bishop, William Taylor, called by the his- 
torian Hurst, "the modern St. Paul." 
Upland, Indiana became the site of this 
University in 1893 and since then we find 
that progess is the word of the century. 



1957 






1900 




Never in the world's history has so much 
been accomplished by so few in such a 
short time. Taylor has accepted the chal- 
lenge and is making forward strides. With 
the prayers of faithful Christians and the 
help of an Omnipotent God, our univer- 
sity is marching forward to triumph in 
modern education and spiritual growth 
through PROGRESS! 




1923 



1928 



1902 




1911 




1916 





1923 




Dr. Burt W. Ayres 



One of Taylor's most celebrated alumnus was transferred to his 
eternal home January 26, 1958. Dr. Ayres, one of Taylor's most 
beloved faculty members and a great spiritual giant, joined the 
school in a teaching role in 1896. Since then he has guided the 
alma mater to achieving her goals. His testimony and long record 
of service to God and to Taylor will live in the hearts of those who 
knew and loved him. 



Zke 195$ 



Qem 




TAYLOR UNIVERSITY, UPLAND, INDIANA 




"The heavens declare the glory of God; and the 
firmament sheweth his handywork." Psalm 19:1. 




"Rich gift God. A year of time." Whittier. 



The nucleus of Taylor activities is found in 
the oldest building on the campus, Maria Wright 
Hall. Here we find our leaders of progress in 
their offices, formulating and administering 
plans which are essential for growth and de- 
velopment. Relics from the past are housed in 
the museum; the art and speech departments 
are located on the third floor, and nearly every 
student has a class in the "Ad" building at one 
time or another during the week. 
From the cornerstone which Bishop William 
Taylor laid in 1890 to the tower, important 
people are performing important jobs that keep 
the university wheels running smoothly. 





OUR LEADER 
IN PROGRESS 

Dr. Evan Bergwall, an alumnus of Taylor University, 
is also a graduate of Yale University School of Divinity. 
He has taken further graduate work at New York Uni- 
versity, Emery University, and Oxford University, and he 
was awarded the degree of Doctor of Divinity by Asbury 
Theological Seminary. President and Mrs. Bergwall, 
shown here with their sons, Evan Jr. and David, have 
just completed their seventh year of service at the head 
of our school. 




My Christian friends, 

Again we come to the close of another year at Taylor and 
rejoice in the many blessings that have been ours. How grateful I 
am personally, to know and work with our fine student body and our 
consecrated faculty and staff. Great are our compensations from 
the hand of God! 

As we face the unknown tomorrows we do so with con- 
fidence. We labor cooperatively under the guidance of God in a 
"great work." Let us pray and let us work for the achievement of 
God's best in our individual lives and the collective life of the college. 

May God's best attend your way, each one, in the days 
and years that lie ahead. 

Your friend in Christ, 
Evan H. Bergwall 




The first couple enjoying the Junior-Senior Banquet. 





The Board of Trustees acts 
as chief co-ordinators for 
our university. Through 
much organization, plan- 
ning and prayer these men 
give of their time to aid the 
progression of Taylor. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Standing, l-r: Harold Halleen, Earl Sticklen, Richard Halfast, Charles Shilling, 
G. Harlowe Evans. Seated: Evan Bergwall, Ted Engstrom, Howard Skinner, 
Arthur Hodson, Clarence Varns, Herbert Frazer, David Cox. 



10 



ALUMNI BOARD 



An active part of Taylor's functions are due to the Alumni 
Board as they inform and contact alumni from all over the 
world to the needs of this institution. Those who leave our 
campus remain actively interested and give of time, money, 
and prayers for our advancement. 




Alumni Committee, l-r: Wilbur Cleveland, Wallace Deyo, 
Maurice Coburn, AAilton Persons, Ralph Long, Loyal Ringen- 
berg, Hugh Freese. 



Maurice Coburn, Alumni President, 
and J. Floyd Seelig. 



II 



ACADEMIC LEADERS 




The consistent Christian life and genuine friendliness of Dr. Milo A. Rediger have won 
the respect and love of the faculty and students in his ministry as Academic Dean. Dr. 
Rediger holds the A.B., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees. 



We find Dr. William D. Green 
caught in the whirl of external 
and internal pressures that 
make up the duties of Dean 
of Students. This position re- 
quires tact, patience and Chris- 
tian love, qualities well por- 
trayed in his life. Dr. Green 
holds the A.B., M.A., and Ed.D. 
degrees. 




12 




Mr. Paul Keller, B.S., Mus. M. 

Business Manager 




Miss Grace D. Olson, A.B., A.M. 

Registrar and Director of Admissions 



Rev. Harold Camp 

Vice-President in charge of Development 



Mr. Wilbur Cleveland, A.B., M.R.E. 

Director of Public and Alumni Relations 



13 




Public and Alumni Relations: l-r., Wilbur Cleveland, director; Alice Shippy, office manager; Norma 

Cotner, secretary. 

Mrs. Ida Herber, switchboard oper- 
ator. 




Graduates of Taylor University in 1953, Rev. and 
Mrs. David LeShana now serve as our college 
evangelists. Dave and Becky perform a multiplicity 
of duties, including holding revivals and speaking 
on the Taylor University radio program, "Chapel 
Meditations." This year Rev. LeShana has a new 
duty of planning and directing "Focus," our tele- 
vision program. 



14 




L-r: Betty Freese, secretary to the Academic Dean; Barbara Hess, secretary to the Registrar; Marian 
Kendall, secretary to the Dean of Students. 




The business staff: Donna Wise, Olive 
DeCamp, Carolyn Wolfgang, Virginia 
Cline. 



'-■ H' 




Mrs. Edith Miller, director of the Mailing 
and Duplicating Department. 



15 




MISS JENNIE ANDREWS 

A.B., M.A., Assistant Profes- 
sor of Elementary Education 



DR. HAZEL E. BUTZ 

B.S. Ed., M.A., Ph.D., 
Associate Professor of 
English 



MR. PAUL BARKMAN 

A.B., M.A., S.T.B., Assistant 
Professor of Religion and 
Psychology 




MR. EARL L. CRAVEN 

A.B., M.A., Assistant Pro- 
fessor and Director of Phys- 
ical Education 



A select group of professors, who have dedicated 
their lives to the Lord's service in the field of educa- 
tion, compose our faculty. As the well known Taylor 
Tower rises upward, so our faculty aids in our rising 
upward on the road to unlimited possibilities. 



DR. HILDRETH CROSS 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor 
Psychology and Director of 
Testing 



MISS LORRAINE M. DILLON 

A.B., M.Mus., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Piano and Voice 



MISS VIVIAN A. DOW 

A.B., M.A., Assistant 
Professor of Philosophy 





MR. WILLIAM A. FISHER 

B.S., M.S., Assistant Profes- 
sor of Physical Education 




MISS HULDA FRITZEMEIR 

B.A., M.A., Assistant 
Professor of English 



MRS. MARY GREEN 

A.B., M.A., Instructor in 
Mathematics 



ir faculty is aware of the problems which face 

; college student and they are always willing 

aid us as we prepare ourselves as "workers to- 
ther for Him." 



MRS. HELEN L. GREENLEAF 

A.B., M.A., Assistant 
Professor and Head of the 
Department of Modern 
Language 




MR. MEREDITH HAINES 

A.B., B.D., A.M., Assistant 
Professor of Social Science 
and Religion 




»«f*'- ';«»» 



\ 




MRS. ROBERTA KELLY 

B.S., M.S., Assistant 
Professor of Home Economics 




MISS ROBERTA KESSLER 

B.S., Ele.Ed., Instructor in 
Business Education 





MR. GORDON KREUGER 

A.B., M.A., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry 



MR. HERBERT D. LEE 

B.S., M.A., Assistant 
Professor of English 



MR. WILLIAM LOEWEN 

Instructor of German 



■■-■■.■■: '■■ ' 



MR. BURTON MAHLE 

A.B., M.A., Assistant 
Professor of Music 



"Study to shew thyself aprroved unto God, a work- 
man that needth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing 
the word of truth." — II Timothy 2:15. 




MR. FRED LUTHY 

A.B., B.D., Assistant 
Professor of Religion 



MR. DONALD T. MARTIN 

A.B., B.D., Assistant 
Professor in Speech 




DR. ELMER NUSSBAUM 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., 
Associate Professor of 
Physics and Mathematics, 
Chairman of the Division 
of Natural Sciences 






MR. DON ODLE 

B.S., Ed., M.S., Associate 
Professor of Physical Edu- 
cation and Director of 
Athletics 



MR. JACK B. PATTON 

A.B., M.A., Assistant 
Professor of Art 



MISS ELIZABETH POE 

A.B., B.Rel., M.A., Assistant 
Professor of Biology 



"Six days thou shalt labour and do all thy work:" 
Deuteronomy 5:13. 



MR. GEORGE E. RAY 

B.S., M.A., B.L., Associate 
Professor of Education and 
Psychology, Chairman of 
the Division of Education 
and Psychology 




MR. FRANK H. ROYE 

A.B., B.D., Th.D., Assistant 
Professor of Sociology 



MISS JEAN SCHABINGER 

A.B., M.S.Ed., Assistant 
Professor of Women's 
Physical Education 



DR. ALBERT W. SCHROER 

B.S., B.S.fMus.), A. A., Ed.D. 
Professor of Music and Head 
of the Fine Arts Division 






MR. DALE E. SHEPFER 

B.M.E., M.M., Assistant 
Professor of Instrumental 
Music and Organ 



MR. WINSTON B. SMITH 

A.B., B.D., Instructor in 
Physical Education, Director 
of Intramural Athletics 



MISS HILDA STEYER 

A.B., B.M., M.Mus., Assistant 
Professor of Music 




MISS MILDRED STRATTON 

A.B., M.A., Assistant 
Professor of English 



MR. DALTON VAN VALKENBURG 

A.B., M.A., Assistant 
Professor of Business and 
Economics 



DR. PAUL H. WOOD 

A.B., A. A., Ed.D., Associate 
Professor of Religious 
Education 




MISS VIDA G. WOOD 

B.S., M.S., Assistant 
Professor of Biology 



DR. PATON YODER 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professo 
of History and Politico 
Science, Chairman of th< 
Division of Social Science 




TELEVISION AND RADIO 




■ 




Our University is one of the first Christian colleges to have a television program 
of its own. FOCUS is broadcast from a Muncie station, WLBC-TV, and each 
department of education participates with programs corresponding to their field. 



An essential person in operat- 
ing these programs is Orlan 
Lehmann, technician. 





Chapel Meditations, Taylor's radio program, is 
directed by Rev. Dave LeShana, as is the television 
program. Chapel Meditations has a wide listening 
audience in the U. S. as well as having been heard 
around the free world and behind the Iron Curtain. 



L-r: R. Bible, A. Hansen, W. Samson, H. Young, Professor M. Haines, Sponsor; G. Dilley, C. Fraley, 
President; K. Dilley, E. Anderson. 



AMBASSADORS FOR CHRIST 



"To Make Him Known" is the theme of Ambas- 
sadors for Christ, an organization that gives a 
vision of what can be done for the Lord through 
prayer for missionaries, gifts and dedicated lives. 
The organization sponsors the annual "Missionary 
Conference." 



As the members of Holiness League gather to 
study and meditate on the word of God, they 
seek to fulfill their theme, "To Know Christ," 
and to follow the verse found in Colossians 2:6 — 
"As ye have therefore received Christ Jesus the 
Lord, so walk ye in Him." 



HOLINESS LEAGUE 



Seated: l-r.: S. Newhard, J. Smith, D. Bontrager, J. Wagner, R. Larsen, president; standing, l-r.: R. 
Erickson, R. Trapp, Professor G. Kreuger, advisor. 



m^fl^ — ***■ 







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Representing the Student Pastors are S. Beach, B. Kendall, and A. Hansen. 




Student Pastors lead a busy and profitable 
life as they study here at Taylor and actively 
participate in a community church program as 
pastors. This experience gives them confidence 
and understanding plus the deep realization of 
their dependency upon God. 



'Thy word have I hid in mine heart . . ." 




MB m 



Jay Kesler, student evangelist and Marion Youth 
for Christ director. 





Front, l-r: K. Dilley, D. Larsen, C. Ford, 
G. Dilley, L. VanMeter. Back, l-r: H. 
Mathison, A. Newhard, D. Linhart, E. 
Anderson, J. Wagner. 



Personal Evangelism: "Saved to Serve" is the 
motto of this organization comprised of dedicated 
students who volunteer their time and services to 
the business of winning souls. They help with such 
activities as street meetings, visitations for local 
ministers, and excursions to hospitals and 
orphanages. 





We must carry the Word to every 
creature! 



Personal Evangelism Trio: S. Moore, K. Bihl, E. 
Laughlin, A. Heiber. 



25 




The Post Office, Bookstore, and Grill is a three-in-one building on campus. 



'Grandpa" Francis — the friendly postmaster. 




"Let's go to the P. O." is a well worn statement 
on this campus. Here we may purchase stamps, 
and mail and collect those longed-for letters. 




What, no mail! They can't do this to me! 



KOLLEGE KORNER SHOP AND GRILL 




A place to gather after ballgames and between classes to discuss items from politics to romance. 





Many foot-weary hours are spent by those who 
work so we might have pleasure. 



Mrs. Catherine Loewen is the competent pro- 
prietress of the Bookstore. 



27 




SICKLER HALL 



Sickler Hall, more commonly known as the "Ed" Building, has evolved from a dormitory for men to 
the second home of many education majors. This forty-nine-year-old building houses classrooms, 
faculty offices, offices of the GEM, Echo, and Youth Conference and two well-equipped laboratories 
for elementary and secondary education. 



28 




"If any man lack wisdom let him ask of God . . . and it shall be given him." James 1:5. 




The new curriculum laboratories provide practice and work space for the elementary 
and secondary education students. 



29 




Standing; l-r: V. Gay, C. Prater, J. Legg, W. Roth, R. Merz. Seated: G. Rupp, Professor P. Barkman, 
advisor; R. Shippy, M. Starkweather. 



RECORD OF PROGRESS 



Under the capable leadership of William Doell, 
the GEM moved forward. 



Always moving forward, is the desire of the GEM 
staff as it seeks to map out and build a memorable 
yearbook for use in future days. Many hours have 
been spent in the organization, art work, copy 
and photography to bring this publication into 
being as a unique history of events. This history 
may be evidenced in the picture-filled pages of 
this GEM. 




30 





Editor William Doell 

Associate Editor Jane Legg 

Business Manager Gene Rupp 

Business Assistant Ronald Bible 

Literary Editor Rosanne Shippy 

Sports Editors ........ Wally Roth, Ray Merz 

Literary Writers David Kemp, Audrey 

Hebbert, Priscilla McMahan, Mary Rigle, 
Martha Brose, Evelyn Martin, Faith Springer, 
Elaine Boothe, Lois Martin, Barbara Coy 

Art Editor Stan Beach 

Art Assistants Chris Key, Loran McKinley 

Chief Photographer Vernon Gay 

Photographer James Crowder 

Proof Editor Marjorie Starkweather 

Typing Editor Kerrie Graham 

Advisors Professor Dalton Van 

Valkenberg, Professor Herbert Lee 



31 




ECHO staff at work. 



REPORT OF PROGRESS 



Miriam Martin, Editor 
William Doell, Co-Editor 




The Echo banquet — a time of reward. 




Harvey Rechsteiner 
Business Manager 



32 



THE ECHO 

Echoes of campus life resound in the college 
newspaper. As activities and events occur, they 
are covered by efficient and footsore reporters. 
Layouts, plans, articles and pictures are given tire- 
less consideration before they can fulfill the verse, 
"Ye shall know the Truth." . . . John 8:32. 




Marjorie Starkweather, Editor; Leif Terdal, Busi- 
ness Manager; Wally Roth, Associate Editor. 



The final product 




STUDENT EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 




Seated; l-r: M. Stratton, advisor; G. Rupp, R. Wolfe, president; J. Andrews, sponsor. Standing: R. Shippy, 
L. Ringenberg, J. Tillinghast, R. Jordan, P. Hamilton, R. Closson, C. Murdoch. 



The members of the Taylor chapter of the S.E.A. make a present-day step into the future-day life of 
a professional teacher. The club's programs are varied, including: educational films, demonstrations, 
panel discussions and special speakers. Much interest is shown in the state organization which en- 
ables future teachers to become acquainted with the vast teaching family of Indiana. 



34 




The Children's Literature plays provide a highlight in the elementary depart- 
ment. Student directors and actors work together to gain experience in play 
production. 



The aftermath of hours of student-teaching is the Student-Faculty Banquet. 





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■'■:'»" 



HELENA WRIGHT MUSIC HALL 




"Music is the mediator between the spiritual and 
the sensual life. Although the spirit be not master 
of that which it creates through music, yet it is 
blessed in this creation, which like every creation 
of art, is mightier than the artist." Beethoven 



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Row 1, l-r: R. Lorenzano, S. Wilhelm, M. Marshall, J. Brennan, W. Jorg, J. Hoffman, M. Zimmerman, D. Reimer, J. Shaffer, 
G. Combs, D. Hefelfinger, B. Mahle. Row 2: R. Skaaden, E. Browne, D. JaVor, J. Lammon, M. Brose, G. Haakensen, A. 
Newhard, M. Wilox, N. Rowley, J. Watson, B. Coburn, A. Frehse. Row 3: B. Wagner, H. Jackson, D. Bruce, J. Oswalt, P. 
Jorg, D. Leigh, R. Beaverson, J. Galford, R. Huffman, N. Richards. Row 4: D. Parris, P. Williams, J. Johnson, F. Pomeroy, 
D. Williams, D. McCarty, R. Seaman, R. Sumney. 



Through their ministry in song the A Cappella 
Choir has thrilled the hearts of many as their 
well-blended voices sing praises to God. The choir 
traveled through Indiana, Illinois, Ohio and Wis- 
consin on a nine day tour. 





unto us a child is born 



Director, teacher and friend, these three, we find 
in Professor Burton Mahle. 



37 




Professor Fred Luthy is the director of Gospel Teams as he auditions and places the various groups. 



Chapel Meditations trio: V. Isaac, G. Haakonsen, 
L. Turbin, W. Jorg. 





L-r: S. Rupp, M. VanDoren, N. Straubel, R. Agar, 
S. Beach, J. Oswalt. 




L-r: standing: E. Howard, W. Blaker, P. Jorg. 
Kneeling: B. Jackson, E. Jessiman. 



Many hours of time and talent are given by 
Taylor students who are members of Gospel Teams. 
They are in much demand in the community and 
out-lying areas for their singing, preaching and 
testimonies. 




L-r: C. Westlake, G. Schell, J. Hall, N. Nor- 
renberns, B. Davis, D. Hess, B. Dvordk. 



L-r: E. Uft, G. Ensor, L. Bledsoe, N. Anderson. 



L-r: M. Tao, E. Nishahara, 
J. Yamauchi, M. Iha, M. 
Studebaker, A. Ramos. 





SING UNTO THE LORD 




Row 1; l-r: R. Jackson, R. Sumney, B. Tucker, G. Shell, Professor Mahle. Row 2: A. Moore, D. Meier, 
J. Tucker, E. Larsen. Row 3: H. Jackson, P. Ingerham, R. Beaverson, R. Hackett, W. Samson. Row 
4: D. Bontrager, J. Johnson, D. Williams, D. Rohm, T. Rumney. 



The men's chorus has sung its way into the hearts of listeners, both here at school and on tours. 
This group of singers, who played an important part in the various conferences and other functions 
on campus, made a tour of Michigan, Ohio and Indiana during the school year. 



Larry Fuhrer, John Okesson, Gary Forbes, Byron Fox. 









The Varsity Quartet will 
represent Taylor in the 
eastern part of the United 
States this year as they 
travel for a large part of 
the summer. Three fresh- 
men and one junior make 
up the musical group. 



ij/k- 




Music Club officers, l-r: D. Hefelfinger, president; W. Jorg, H. Watson, B. Mahle, 
advisor; H. Jackson. 



Anyone who is familiar with our University will realize the important part music plays in the entire 
school program. From the hearty group singing to the more elaborate music recitals, much glory is 
given to God through music. 



Under the leadership of Professor Dale Shepfer our band is becoming an active musical group. 




41 




This is the first year for an orchestra on our 
campus. It was born under the direction of Pro- 
fessor Shepfer, and under his leadership it has 
blossomed into an effective musical organization. 



The Taylor Civic Symphony Orchestra 




The band made a great contribution to the musical life of the campus. 



42 



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The Trumpet Trio, composed of Woody Blaker, Paul Jorg, and Eldon Howard, traveled in Canada 
and Florida holding services during vacations. 





Another new musical group is the Brass 
iuintet. 



Seated, l-r: D. Bruce, D. Baarendse, T. Titus. 
Standing, l-r: J. Grile, M. Hess. 



43 



FALL REVIVAL 




God used Harry Denman to fill the gap that many members of the Taylor family had found in their lives. 




Only eternity will tell the results of Dr. Denman 
on our lives as he helped us start the new school 
year. Because he had such a personal testimony, 
the students listened to his clear-cut Bible mes- 
ages. As we re-evaluated our relationship with 
God during that week of September 29-October 6, 
revival touched the Taylor campus. 



"The Blood of Jesus Christ, God's Son, cleanseth 
us from all sin." I John 1:7. 



". . . let us run with patience the race that is set 
before us" . . . Hebrews 12:1. 




Dr. Gallman unfolding some of God's riches to us. 



SPRING REVIVAL 



Heed God's Word. 




Discussion — an important part of Religious 
Emphasis Week. 




MISSIONARY CONFERENCE 



S IT. NOTHING TO YOU ? 




. Go ye reaching every land ... a phrase of the chorus written for the conference. 



"Choose you this day whom ye will serve. 
Josh. 24:15. 




Through Rev. J. T. Seamonds and Dr. Sidney 
Correll, Taylor's students realized anew that 
Christ is the answer to the world's problems. The 
Missionary Conference chorus reverberated in 
many hearts, challenging us to give our all for the 
all-out campaign for Christ. 



Many decisions were made during the weekend 
to follow Christ even to the mission field. Other 
students renewed former pledges. Fine musical 
programs set the stage and the Holy Spirit 
worked through Rev. Seamonds, missionary to 
India, and Dr. Correll, director of the United 
World Mission, in making this a vital conference. 




". . . though he was rich, yet for your sakes he 
became poor". . . li Corinthians 8:9. 




They helped us see the need of the world through music and the Word. 



47 




Kneeling, l-r: C. Fraley, D. Cuthbertson, R. Wolfe, R. Jordan. Standing, l-r: M. 
Taylor, J. Tillinghast, E. Millikan, C. Carlson, P. Martin, S. Kuhn, J. Sheets, A. 
Newhard, S. Moore. 



CHRIST IN 
SCHOLARSHIP 

"Toward more abundant living" is the motto of 
Chi Alpha Omega, the senior scholastic honor 
society. The members are chosen from the top ten 
percent of the graduating class on the basis 
of scholarship and interests of Christian higher ed- 
ucation. The members chosen strive to make Christ 
first and last in every phase of their lives. 



Waiting to commence. 




..,.4 •*••''. •■'£? 



ORIENTATION LEADERS 




Seated, l-r: G. Rupp, H. Young, C. Justice, M. Margin, M. Foura, H. Rechsteiner, N. Lindgren, M. Stark- 
weather; standing, l-r: T. Hydahl, B. Kendall, E. Larsen, S. Newhard (absent). 



The orientation leaders play an important role in Taylor's student program. They represent our 
school to the incoming students during orientation week, as they lead freshmen and transfer students 
in becoming acquainted with the school, its faculty, various departments, activities, and clubs. 
Throughout the first semester each orientation leader is assigned a certain group of freshmen. He meets 
every week with them, giving aid in study and various problems. 



49 




The first home away from home for many freshman 
girls is found in Swallow Robin Hall. Here girls 
learn, perhaps for the first time, to live, study, 
work, play and pray together. As they progress 
through college they will look back upon their 
freshman home as a symbol of entrance to their 
pathway through life. 



"And her smile was all that I dreamed" 
Tennyson. 



SWALLOW ROBIN HALL 



The Bird Barn 





Roberta "Mom" Kessler is the well-loved house 
mother to Swallow-Robin girls. 



The pizza critic 




Dorm Council: Seated, M. Studebaker, president; M. Brose, D. Troyer, 
M. Leader; standing, J. Hall, M. Carlson. 



51 




From top to bottom the "big house" vibrates with activity. 



WISCONSIN HALL 




From beautiful gospel songs to the resounding 
noise of pranksters, Wisconsin Hall is "home" to 
most Taylor fellows. Here activities are held from 
prayer meeting to bull sessions with emphasis 
placed on wholesome Christian living. 



Rev. and Mrs. Everett Craven — 
commonly called "Mom" and 
"Pop." 



52 



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Wisconsin Hall dormitory council; R. Hamilton, president; C. Fraley, M. Hess, T. Curtis, H. Young, 
R. Valutis, I. Thompson, J. Key. 




Our angels of mercy: Ruth Skaaden, Mrs. 
Lillie Haakonsen. 




TV draws people as a light draws bugs. 



53 



MAGEE-CAMPBELL HALL 




Youth, beauty, and talent — all housed in this one place. 





Mrs. Mildred Wadsworth, "mother" of the "big 
dorm" girls, capably fills her important posi- 
tion. 



"Sleep, that knits up the raveled sleeve of 
care," . . . Shakespeare. 



54 




Dorm Counselors: seated: R. Closson, S. Marshall, N. Lindgren, N. Wittman, S. Gorrell, C. Wharton, 
M. Ward, secretary; J. Haaland, standing: M. Smith, P. Martin, president. 



Within this building there is an ever-present alarm 
of activity. Activities held vary from the high- 
pitched excitement preceding a banquet when 
the halls are decked in an array of beautiful 
colors to the quiet solitude of a prayer meeting. 
Here is the meeting place of campus students as 
they gather for meals, fun, and fellowship. 



How bounteous is Thy goodness to us. 



Conversation — a primary occupation. 




CHI SIGMA PHI — Home Economics Society 




Seated, l-r: Mrs. R. Kelly, advisor; L. Stern, president; 
M. Brumbaugh; standing: D. Larson, B. Schwarzwalder, 
J. Westbrook. 



GAMMA DELTA BETA - cm ***, 

Standing, l-r: N. Rowley, president; Mrs. Mary Roye, advisor; R. Skaaden, Seated, 
l-r: K. Lauber, B. Brown. G. Shepherd, D. Koch, S. Kuhn. 




56 




THE PULSE OF TAYLOR . . . 

HER STUDENT BODY 



The following forty-six pages contain the lifeblood of Taylor, those who inhabit her. One vacation 
on an empty college campus will prove to the skeptic just how much a college or university without 
the students is just a mass of bricks and mortar. The couples on the sidewalks, the scholars in the 
library, the rowdies during quiet hours and the sleepers in the classroom all add a bit of season- 
ing to the Taylor recipe. 



57 




Senior Officers: seated: Coach B. Fisher, advisor; R. AAalson, B. Jordan, president; 
standing: T. Curtis, R. Hamilton. 



?? 



CHRIST OUR GUIDE" 



Jerry D. Alfred 

Markle, Indiana 
Physical Education 
I Corinthians 9:24-27 



Elsa L Anderson 

Arcanum, Ohio 
Elementary Education 
Romans 8:28 



Grayson L. Atha 

West Liberty, Ohio 
Biblical Literature 
Romans 8:38, 39 



Martha Bailey 

Charleston, West Virginic 
Physical Education 
Romans 1 2:1, 2 



Floyd M. Baker 

Watertown, New York 
Physical Education 
Psalms 16:11 



Verle Barrett 

Dayton, Pennsylvania 
Sociology 
Galatians 6:7 




Walter Bauder 

Ellwood City, Penn. 

Biology 

James 4:10 




Stan J. Beach 

Gagetown, Michigan 

Sociology 

II Corinthians 3:3 





William A. Boycott, Jr. 

Ontario, Canada 
Chemistry 
Psalms 16:11 



Beverly Ann Brown 

New Paris, Indiana 
Elementary Education 
Philippians 3:14 



Marianna Brumbaugh 

Scotch Plains, 
New Jersey 
Home Economics 
Romans 8:28 



Harry J. Canning 

Trenton, New Jersey 
Chemistry 
Philippians 4:1 3 






Carolyn Ann Carlson 

Hialeah, Florida 
Elementary Education 
Psalms 32:8 



Lloyd Cochran 

Mount Ayr, Iowa 
English 
Romans 8:28 





Robert A. Cotner 

Kendallville, Indiana 

Biology 

II Corinthians 7:14 



Ted Curtis 

Hudsonville, Michigan 
Physical Education 
I Corinthians 9:24-27 





Duane Cuthbertson 

Lincoln Park, Michigan 

History 

John 14:21 



Gertrude Dahl 

Montague, Michigan 
Elementary Education 
Psalms 32:8 






James H. Dahl 

Union Grove, Wisconsin 

Business 

II Corinthians 4:3 



Gwendolyn Davies 

Bellflower, California 
Elementary Education 
Hebrews 4:15-16 



Robert Davis 

Garrettsville, Ohio 
Psychology 
Psalms 127:1 



Richard Leroy Day 

Gas City, Indiana 
Chemistry 
Matthew 6:33 



Kathleen Dilley 

Ashley, Indiana 
Biblical Literature 
Isaiah 26:3 



R. Edward Dodge, Jr. 

Upland, Indiana 

Biology 

John 3:16 



Dorothy Dzao 

Kowloon, Hong Kong 
Elementary Education 
Psalms 23 



Rose Easterday 

Racine, Ohio 
Elementary Education 
Matthew 6:33 



Ruth Ann Edmunds 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 

English 

John 14:27 



Jemima Ensing 

Hudsonville, Michigan 
Elementary Education 
Isaiah 40:31 



Ronald M. Fassett 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Sociology 

Philippians 3:10 



Charles D. Fraley 

Hollansburg, Ohio 
Chemistry 
Philippians 3:9 





Arlene Frehse 

Norway, Michigan 
Elementary Education 
I Samuel 12:24 



George Allen Glass 

Alexandria, Indiana 
Physical Education 
Romans 5:1 9 





Betty Godsey 

Norwood, Ohio 
Psychology 
Isaiah 26:3 



Robert A. Griffith 

Madison, Georgia 

English 

Psalms 48:14 





Ralph C. Gyde 

Oak Harbor, Ohio 
Chemistry 
Proverbs 3:5, 6 



Russell Lee Hamilton 

Cincinnati 1 1 , Ohio 

History 

Philippians 1:20, 21 





Hubert L. Hansel 

Mendon, Ohio 
Physical Education 
Romans 10:9 



G. Arthur Hansen, Jr. 

Bloomfield, New Jersey 

History 

Philippians 1 :20, 21 









Garry Kent Hatfield 

Elkhart, Indiana 
Chemistry 
John 3:16 



Austin Havens 

Henderson, Nebraska 
Mathematics 
Psalms 84:1 1 



Martin L. Hess 

Gordon, Nebraska 

History 

Psalms 27:1 



Arbin Hill 

Daytona Beach, Florida 

Psychology 

I Thessalonians 5:24 



Joan Hoff 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Physical Education 
Psalms 138:8 



Rhinehart A. Housaman, Jr 

Lincoln Park, AAichigan 
Physical Education 
Philippians 3:14 






Walter T. Huitema 

Plainfield, Wisconsin 

Philosophy 

Psalms 68:9 



Bradley Hughes 

Upland, Indiana 
Chemistry 
Matthew 6:33 



May lha 

Koloa, Kauai, Hawaii 
Elementary Education 
Psalms 27:1 



John R. Johnson 

Antigo, Wisconsin 
Social Studies 
John 14:6 



Ruby Marie Johnston 

Modoc, Indiana 
Elementary Education 
Colossians 3:17 



Roger M. Jones 

Kenosha, Wisconsin 
Elementary Education 
Romans 8:38-39 



Geraldine Jordan 

High Point, N. C. 
Elementary Education 
Deuteronomy 31 :8 



Robert Jordan 

Forest Junction, Wise. 
Physical Education 
Colossians 2:6, 7 



Charlotte Justice 

Upland, Indiana 
English 
Hebrews 1 1 :6 



Jay Kesler 

South Bend, Indiana 
Biblical Literature 
Jude 1:22 



Christine Key 

Ardmore, Oklahoma 
Elementary Education 
Psalms 32:8 



Ley Roy D. Kinzer 

Marion, Indiana 
Psychology 
Philippians 1 -.6 



Takako Kokame 

Kalaheo, Kauai, Hawaii 
Elementary Education 
Psalms 32:8 



Connie Kuehnle 

Gary, Indiana 
Elementary Education 
Romans 8:28- 
Jeremiah 33:3 








Shield May Kuehnle 

Gary, Indiana 
Social Studies 
Psalms 103 



Suzanne Kuhn 

Monroe, Indiana 
Elementary Education 
II Corinthians 5:15 



Ellis L. Larsen 

Brooklyn, New York 

Psychology 

II Timothy 4:2 



Rolf Eide Larsen 

Brooklyn, New York 
Biblical Literature 
II Thessalonians 3:3 



Eleanor Laughlin 

Pataskela, Ohio 
Elementary Education 
Isaiah 41:10 



Jane Ann Legg 

Michigan City, Indiana 
Elementary Education 
Hebrews 12:1, 2 






Orlan R. Lehmann 

Akron, Ohio 
Chemistry 
Acts 26:18 



Nancy Lindgren 

Akron, Ohio 
Business 
Proverbs 4:18 



William M. Loewen 

Upland, Indiana 
Sociology 
Romans 8:32 



John C. Louthain 

Kokomo, Indiana 

Sociology 

I Corinthians 10:1 3 



Arlene Lundquist 

Chicago, Illinois 
English 
Psalms 16:11 



Kenneth McGarvey 

Dearborn, Michigan 
Biblical Literature 
I Peter 3:15 



Thomas Veryl McGranor 

Newark, Ohio 
Social Studies 
James 1 :17 



Ruth Malson 

Marion, Indiana 

English 

I Corinthians 10:13 



Miriam Martin 

Holdridge, Nebraska 

English 

John 6:33 



A. Patricia Martin 

Vinton, Iowa 
Chemistry 
Philippians 1:6 



Jinchi Matsudo 

Puukalii, Mavi, T. H. 
Biblical Literature 
Colossians 3:1, 4 



Dwight L. Meier 

Kingman, Arizona 
Biblical Literature 
I Thessalonians 2:1 2 



Eloise Millikan 

South Bend, Indiana 

Psychology 

John 14:6 



Paul Millikan 

Lincoln Park, Michigan 

History 

I John 4:11 






Anna Newhard 

Uniondale, Indiana 
Elementary Education 
Psalms 121 



Lois Paulson 

Faribault, Minnesota 
Elementary Education 
Galatians 2:20 




Larry Paxson 

Bryant, Indiana 
Social Studies 
I Peter 5:7 



Myrna Lynch Price 

Warren, Indiana 
English 
Proverbs 4:18 



Ruth Ralston 

Clinton, Indiana 
English 
Psalms 138:8 



Alex M. Ramos 

Manila, Philippines 
Psychology 
Matthew 16:24 



Sharlene Rankin 

Port Huron, Michigan 
Elementary Education 
Isaiah 40:31 



Robert M. Rapson 

Bad Axe, Michigan 
Physical Education 
Jeremiah 33:3 



Harvey H. Rechsteiner 

Lombard, Illinois 
Mathematics 
Acts 27:25 



Walter David Richards 

Chicago, Illinois 
Secondary Education 
I John 1:6 



M. Lenore Ringenberg 

Grabill, Indiana 
Elementary Education 
Proverbs 3:5-6 



Nancy A. Rowley 

Toledo, Ohio 
Music 
Jeremiah 33:3 





Gene Lee Rupp 

Archbold, Ohio 
Mathematics 
Psalms 34:4 



Charles D. Saleska 

AAilwaukee, Wisconsin 

Psychology 

Psalms 63:1 



Blanche Schwarzwalder 

Shreve, Ohio 
Home Economics 
Psalms 37:4, 5 



Jean Lehman Sheets 

Geneva, Indiana 
Elementary Education 
II Corinthians 5:17 





Larry A. Sheets 

Louisville, Ohio 
Physical Education 
Romans 5:8 



Ruth Alice Sparks 

Garrett, Indiana 
Elementary Education 
Proverbs 3:5, 6 



Thomas J. Spear 

Jersey City, N. J. 
Physical Education 
Romans 12:1, 2 



Paul Stubbs 

Harrod, Ohio 
Biblical Literature 
Matthew 5:6 







Roland Sumney 

Spencerville, Indiana 

Business 

Proverbs 3:5, 6 



Barbara Jean Sumwalt 

Hartford City, Indiana 
Elementary Education 
Isaiah 41:10 



Mitsue Tao 

Honolulu, Hawaii 
Elementary Education 
Philippians 3:13, 14 



Marilyn Taylor 

Marion, Indiana 
Elementary Education 
Philippians 3:10 



Dolores Thompson 

Williamston, S. C. 
Elementary Education 
Jeremiah 29:1 1 



Irvin Thompson 

East Springfield, Penn. 

Physical Education 

I Corinthians 9:24-27 



Joy Tillinghast 

Eastport, New York 
Elementary Education 
I Samuel 12:24 



Ronald Dean Trapp 

Aurora, Illinois 
Biblical Literature 
Philippians 3:10 



Lulu Turbin 

Merrill, Michigan 

English 

Isaiah 26:3 



Wilma Ruth Vander Bie 

Holland, Michigan 
Elementary Education 
Psalms 16:1 1 



Jane Vanzant 

Clemes, Ohio 
Elementary Education 
II Timothy 1:12 



Howard L. Watson 

Rand, West Virginia 

Music 

Isaiah 50:7 



Jean Elaine Watson 

Haddon Heights, N. J. 

Music 

Proverbs 3:5, 6 



Cary Westlake 

Sharpsville, Pennsylvania 

English 

Psalms 116:1, 2, 8 






Robert Wolfe 

Markle, Indiana 
Mathematics 
Romans 5:8 



Harry A. Young 

Oak Harbor, Ohio 
Biblical Literature 
Psalms 37:4, 5 



Betty Arlene Ziegler 

Fawn Grove, Penn. 
Elementary Education 
John 15:16 



Kenneth Zigmond 

Highland Park, Michigan 

History 

Ephesians 2:8, 9 



Phyllis Engle 

Dayton, Ohio 
Elementary Education 
Matthew 6:33 



Lucille Stern 

Mill Hall, Pennsylvania 
Home Economics 
Psalms 91:2 








jjf ' ^mmn"^ 



SENIOR ACTIVITIES 




"Fisher-impersonator" Jordan instructs "Coach 
Smith." 



A curious savage? 




70 



Yeah, they're real musicians. 



These are but a few of the activities tha this very 
active class presented for the student body's en- 
joyment. Talent was unlimited in the class of 1958, 
and they never hesitated to use it. The social and 
activity programs will miss their spirit and 
originality. 



"Prexy" accepts the controls for the senior gift. 




WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN 

COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 



Scholarship, leadership, and character are 
the basis for selection into Who's Who. 
Those selected must also show promise for 
continuation of these traits in their fut- 
ure lives as Christian citizens in the world. 




DUANE CUTHBERTSON'S vibrant personality 
and leadership ability have enabled him to 
serve effectively as president of the student- 
body. "Cubby" is a history major. His versatility 
is shown in his activities which include, presi- 
dent of the junior class, membership in the 
Symposium Dialecticum and participation on the 
baseball and track teams. 



CHARLES FRALEY, a chemistry major, aspires 
to become a medical missionary. His acclaim 
here has come through his staunch leadership 
in the spiritual activities of the campus. He has 
served as class chaplain, Youth Conference 
prayer co-chairman and leader of the altar 
counselors. He has served on the Wisconsin 
dorm council and was president of Ambassadors 
for Christ this year. 



71 




BETTY GODSEY, who is majoring in psychology, 
has enjoyed a variety of activities during her 
years at Taylor. She has been active in student 
government, having represented her class for 
the past two years on the Student Council. She 
also has served as secretary of the A Cappella 
Choir. 



MARTIN HESS has used his major field of history 
in a practical way in his work with student 
government. He has served as vice-president of 
the Student Council for two years and as pres- 
ident of the Association of Evangelical Stu- 
dents. Marty also has been president of the 
A Cappella Choir, president of the Social 
Science Club, orientation leader and an im- 
portant member of the track team. 



72 



ROBERT JORDAN, president of the senior class, 
has demonstrated his dynamic leadership in 
working as a representative to the Student 
Council, chairman of the Student Project, pres- 
ident of Wisconsin Dormitory and president of 
the Trojan Players. Bob is a physical education 
major and a valuable member of the football 
team and the track team. 



MIRIAM MARTIN has been actively engaged 
in the governmental and literary areas of 
campus life. Miriam, an English major, climaxed 
her activities as a member of the Echo staff 
by editing that publication in 1957. Other areas 
of service and activity in which she has par- 
ticipated include the Gem staff, Symposium 
Dialecticum, dorm council and the inter-class 
council. She also served as treasurer of her 
sophomore class and as an orientation leader. 




PAT MARTIN is best know for her versatility 
in many fields. She has been president of 
Magee Dormitory for two years, secretary of 
Symposium Dialecticum, and orientation leader. 
She has held offices in her class, science club, 
and Gamma Delta Beta. Pat, who is active in the 
field of sports, is a chemistry major. 



As an English major, RUTH RALSTON has served 
as president of the English Club during this year. 
Ruth has been active in Youth Conference work, 
and this year she served capably in the all- 
important position of Youth Conference co- 
Chairman. She, too, is a member of Symposium 
Dialecticum. 





During his years spent at Taylor, HARVEY 
RECHSTEINER served as chairman of the Stu- 
dent Judiciary, vice-president of the Symposium 
Dialecticum, orientation leader and business 
manager of the Echo. Harvey majored in 
mathematics. 



In addition to his studies of mathematics and 
science, ROBERT WOLFE has been co-chairman 
of the Trojan Council and president of the 
Science Club. This year Bob has very ably 
served as president of the Student Education 
Association. 



73 




Junior officers: seated; G. Haakonsen, Coach Craven, advisor; standing: D. Linhart, 
R Beaverson, president; R. Merz. 



BLAZERS FOR CHRIST 




Roslyn Bahr 

Bemidji, Minn. 



74 



Irene Barrett 

Dayton, Pa. 



Roger Beaverson 

Wauseon, O. 



Janet Berst 

Cincinnati, O. 



David Bowman 

Fruitland, N. M. 



John Brownsberger 

Louisville, O. 



Grace Combs 

Detroit, Mich. 



Carol Coyner 

Mishawaka, Ind. 



Steven Creutz 

Lincoln Park, Mich. 



Darwin Damewood 

Clarinda, la. 



Ruth Dillon 

Shipshewana, Ind. 




75 




William Doell 

Cincinnati, O. 



Betty Egeberg 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Dean Ensor 

Cockeysville, Md. 



Marilyn Follett 

Cincinnati, O. 



Carol Ford 

Palmyra, Pa. 



Marlene Foura 

Shamokin, Pa. 



Carol Fricke 

Lombard, III. 



Ann Germaine 

Montrose, Mich. 



Susanne Gorrell 

Spencerville, Ind. . 



Kerrie Graham 

Indianapolis, Ind. 



76 



John Grile 

Bluffton, Ind. 



David Gustafson 

Bemidpi, Minn. 



Dick Guthrie 

Washington, Pa. 



Gladys Haakonsen 

Upland, Ind. 



Phyllis Hamilton 

Anderson, Ind. 



Adolf Hansen 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Enid Hansen 

Lynchburg, Va. 



Paul Harris 

Cincinnati, O. 



Janet Hartman 

Pigeon, Mich. 



Audrey Hebbert 

Ashby, Nebr. 




77 




Doris Hefelfinger 

Phillipsburg, O. 



Arlene Hieber 



New Washington, O. 



Harold Jackson 

Marion, Ind. 



Beverly Johnson 

Chicago, III. 



Mary Johnson 

Chicago, III. 



Wilma Jorg 

Bluffton, O. 



David Kemp 

Shinglehouse, Pa. 



William Kendall 

Highland Park, AAich. 



James Key 

Ardmore, Okla. 



George Klohck 

Johnstown, N. Y. 



78 



Delia Koch 

McCook, Nebr. 



John Lantz 

Greenville, O. 



Delores Larsen 

Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 



Anne Leland 

Wabash, Ind. 



Dale Linhart 

Minerva, O. 



Rose Marie Lorenzana 

Manila, P. I. 



Sue McCune 

Geneva, Ind. 



Priscilla McMahan 

Peoria, O. 



Mary Maynard 

Elsie, Mich. 



Leah Mediovosky 

Keene, N. H. 




79 




Raymond Merz 

Cincinnati, O. 



Naomi Metzger 

Imlay City, Mich. 



Gretchen Miller 

Valparaiso, Ind. 



Ann Montgomery 

Willowick, O. 



Sandra Moore 

Jackson, Mich. 



Robert Morgan 

Belle Vernon, Pa. 



Cleo Murdoch 

Orleans, Nebr. 



Sue Newhard 

Uniondale, Ind. 



Edna Nishihara 

Kauia, T. H. 



John Okesson 

Jamestown, N. Y. 



80 



Sharon Osborn 

Bluffton, Ind. 



Clifford Owens 

Muncie, Ind. 



Roger Peck 

Kendallville, Ind. 



Sara Lou Peck 

Chester, Pa. 



Sharon Perkins 

Lombard, III. 



Jack Rabine 

Berne, Ind. 



William Reasner 

Collingswood, N. J. 



Darlene Reimer 

Goshen, Ind. 



Lorry Rioux 

Davisburg, Mich. 



Grady Rogers 

Columbus, O. 




81 




Wally Roth 

Morton, III. 



Wayne Rowell 

Morton, III. 



Tom Rumney 

Albany, N. Y. 



Connie Sallberg 

Bemidji, Minn. 



Glenn Schell 

Sycamore, III. 



Barbara Schultz 

Pontiac, Mich. 



Gloria Shepherd 

Oxford, Pa. 



Rosanne Shippy 

Upland, Ind. 



Naomi Sipe 

Rockford, O. 



Ruth Skaaden 

Minneapolis, Minn. 



82 



Janis Smith 

Ionia, Mich. 



Lois Smith 

Wabash, Ind. 



Raymond Smith 

Albany, Ind. 



Ronald Spade 

Berne, Ind. 



Faith Springer 

Canton, O. 



Pat Stall 

Gibbon, Nebr. 



Marjorie Starkweather 

Jamestown, N. Y. 



Leif Terdahl 

Muskegon, Mich. 



Larry Thomas 

Ridgeville, Ind. 



Lavonn Tieszen 

Marion, S. D. 




83 




Robert Trout 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 



Art Turner 

Windsor, Ont. 



Barbara Udisky 

Warren, Ind. 



Ronald Valutis 

Detroit, Mich. 



Ramona Walker 

Crestline, O. 



Judy Weber 

Wauseon, O. 



Joan Westbrook 

Croswell, Mich. 



Michael Williams 

Montpelier, Ind. 



Nancy Wittman 

Tiffin, O. 



June Yamauchi 

Kauai, T. H. 



84 



JUNIOR ACTIVITIES 





If it were not for the juniors the seniors 
would never get down that aisle! 



No, not the 1920's — just the "Sack Days" in 1958. 



Oh my! What can the matter be? 




JUNIOR-SENIOR 





Marlene Foura — gracious Ban- 
quet chairman. 



The plaza overlooked a swimming pool and 
spacious golf course. 




Robert Cocherille, concert tenor, and Jack Connor, marimba player, provided those in attendance 
with an evening of musical enjoyment. 



86 



BANQUET 



<* 




The beautiful Orchard Ridge Country Club was 
the site of the long waited-for Junior-Senior 
Banquet. The theme "Fantasy in Flight" was 
carried out with modernistic decorations that 
helped set the mood of the evening. 




Red and white carnations added a striking note to the head table. 



87 



SOLDIERS OF THE CROSS 




Sophomore officers; seated: P. Barkman, advisor; standing; l-r: M. Wilcox, P. Ingerham, president; 
W. Samson, S. Marshall. 




DAVID ADAMS 

ANNABELLE AMSTUTZ 

CLAUDIA JO AMSTUTZ 
NANCY ANDERSON 



SUE ANDREWS 

BETTY AUGUSTINE 

SHELDON BASSETT 
HAROLD BEAL 



CAROLYN BENNETT 

RONALD BIBLE 

KAREN BIHL 



DeWAYNE BONTRAGER 
BETTY BOWERS 

EDYTHE BROWN 



SHARON BUCKLES 

JOSEPH BYRER 

CURTIS CARTER 



ROSALIE CLOSSON 



BEVERLY COBURN 



BARBARA COY 

JAMES CROWDER 

MARY DELLINGER 



GILBERT DILLEY 

ROBERT DVORAK 

GAIL ENSOR 





RICHARD ERICKSON 

RALPH EWBANK 

PAUL FLICKINGER 



CHARLES FORD 

DORIS FOSTER 

KAREN GARNER 



VERNON GAY 

DAVID GEHRES 

LORETTA GRUVER 



JOAN HAALAND 



RONALD HACKETT 



RALPH HAMILTON 

SIGNE HANSEN 

MARY ESTHER HENNIN 



^*i&JL 



KAY HERRING 

CHARLES HILL 

HOWARD HILLMAN 



DALE HOCHSETTLER 

RODNEY HOFFMAN 

ELDON HOWARD 



ANITA HOWLAND 

CAROL HOWLAND 
JOHN HOYES 



JANET HUFFMAN 

PHILLIP INGERHAM 
NEIL INNES 



MALCOLM JACKSON 
LES JACKSON 



ROBERT F. JACKSON 
ROBERT L. JACKSON 



ROGER JENKINSON 
SALLY JOINER 

JAMES JONES 



ANNETTA JOSEPHS 

PHILLIP JUILLARD 

MARJORIE KAUFFMANN 





JAMES KING 

MARILYN KNUDSON 
JEAN KOCHER 



TRUDY KRIEN 

NANCY LABERDY 

DAVID LARSON 



KATHY LAUBER 

MARIAN LEHMER 

DAVID LEVEILLE 



NANCY JO LIECHTY 

CLARITA LORENZAN 



DAVID McCARTY 

LOREN McKINLEY 



EUGENE MARR 

SOPHIA MARSHALL 

EVELYN MARTIN 



LOIS MARTIN 

HOWARD MATHISEN 

PEGGY MATTHEWS 



GREG MAURER 

PAUL MEIER 

DONALD MELTON 



GLORIA MOENNING 
VERA MOLLER 

ALFRED MOORE 



PAUL MOYER 

ARTHUR NORRIS 

NANNETTE OAKS 



PAT OREM 



JAMES OREN 



JANET ORNE 

RUSSELL OYER 

GLORIA PALACIO 



CECILIA PARCHMENT 

DARRELL PARRIS 

RUSSELL PAULSON 





EVELYN PIERSON 
JUDY PRICE 

ELIZABETH REESE 




FREDA RIDDLE 

MARY LOU RIGGLE 
MARY ROBY 



DEXTER ROHM 

NANCY ROLLE 

EDWARD RUSSELL 



WAYNE SAMSON 



CHARLENE SCHMELTZEF 



RUTH SHIVELY 

RICHARD SHUPE 

MAXINE SMITH 



NANCY SMITH 

DONALD THOMPSON 

DONALD TOLAND 



BERNARD TUCKER 

JERRY TUCKER 

LOIS VAN METER 



JOE WAGNER 

JAMES WALSH 

MARION WARD 



JOAN WARFEL 

LARRY WEAVER 

NANCY WETTER 



CAROL WHARTON 

PAT WILBURN 



MARLENE WILCOX 

SALLY WILHEM 



DALE WILLIAMS 

ROGER WINN 

MARILYN YERKS 



DORALEE YEUTTER 

DEVON YODER 

DARLENE YOUNG 




FRESHMAN CLASS 





i 





Officers; L-r: M. Studebaker, Professor D. Van Valkenburg, advisor; W. Ringenberg, president; D. 
Bruce, L. Fuhrer. 




JOHN AFFLECK 
RUTH AGAR 

PERRY ALLISON 

JAMES ANDERSON 



96 



ANDREW ANDERSON 
JOYCE ANGERER 

PHILLIP ARMSTRONG 
WAYNE AUGUSTINE 



RUTH AYRES 

RICHARD BAARENDSE 
PHYLLIS BATHO 
RICHARD BEPLER 

AUDREY BERNDT 
ROBERT BIBERSTEIN 
WOODLEY BLAKER 
LOIS BLEDSOE 



DAVID BLUMER 
JUDY BOLL 

TERRY BONNETTE 
CAROL BAYS 



JOSEPH BRAIN 

JOANNE BRENNAN 
YVONNE BRIGGS 
MARTHA BROSE 



DAVID BRUCE 

MARY ELLEN BRUNK 
RICHARD BURBRIDGE 
MARY CARLSON 





KAREN CHEESMAN 

MARJORIE CHITWOOD 
EARL CHRISTENSEN 
MADONNA CLEMENTS 

DAVID CONDON 
BEVERLY CORTS 
SHARON COYLE 
DANAL CURTIS 



SAM DELCAMP 
LENA DEPUE 

DONNA DISBENNETT 
PAUL DUFFEY 



MARJORIE EBY 
VILLA ELLIS 

FLOYD FLEETMAN 
GARY FORBES 



GARY FOSS 

DANIEL FOSTER 
BYRON FOX 

DANIEL FREEMAN 



LARRY FUHRER 
JAMES GALFORD 
MERLE GERIG 
JERRY GOSS 



NELSON GOULD 
CONNIE GRANT 
BETTY GRUBBS 
PATSY GRUBBS 



JOELLYN HALL 

BARBARA HANAWALT 
DOROTHY HAND 
JANE HEINLEIN 



DONA HESS 

JUDY HOFFMAN 
ELAINE HOSMAN 
DUANE HOUSER 



BARBARA JACOBSON 
DOROTHY JAVOR 
JEANETTE JOINER 
LEON JONES 



PAUL JORG 

LONNIE JULLIARD 
PINKY JUSTICE 
ELIE KAPUTO 

JANE KINKEAD 

WANDA KNOBELOCH 
MARJORIE KOMP 
HUBERT KUHN 




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BARBARA KUTCHEN 
JUDY LAMMON 

MARY ALICE LEADER 
DONALD LEIGH 



MARY EVELYN LESLIE 
NANCY LEWIS 

JOE McCLANAHAN 
JOHN McCURRY 

HERBERT MclNTOSH 
MYRNA MARSHALL 
PAT MEIER 

CHARLES METZGER 



MARLENE MOORE 
JOYCE MORGAN 
JEAN NEGLEY 
NANCY NORRENBERNS 



JOHN OSWALT 
KAY PASSMORE 
CHARLES PETERS 
JEAN PETTIGREW 



CAROL PIERCE 
FRED POMEROY 
PATTI PRESTON 
RONALD RENOFF 



JAMES REYNOLDS 
PAUL RIEFF 

BILL RINGENBERG 
MICHAEL RIIMGEISEN 



RUTH ROCK 

ROSLYN ROGERS 
DONALD ROLFS 
VERYL ROTH 



SALLY RUNYON 
SHARON RUPP 

CAROLYN SANDSTROM 
PETER SCHUG 



LARRY SCHWERTFAGER 
ROBERT SEAMAN 
JEAN SHAFFER 
MARLENE SILVIS 



LARRY SLAIN 
PHILLIP SPEECE 
JUDY STANICH 

CLARENCE STAURT 



CHARLOTTE STEINER 
RUTH STOCKINGER 
NANCY STRAUBEL 

MARGARET STUDEBAKER 




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JUDY SWEET 

MARGARET TATEM 
REX TAYLOR 

DENNIS THOMPSON 



BRIAN TITIS 

DOROTHY TROYER 
LLOYD ELLEN TUCKER 
CLAYTON TURNER 

EDWINA UTT 

MARCIA VAN DOREN 
NORMA VAN HOVLEN 
RUTH VOLK 



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BARBARA WAGNER 
JANET WATSON 
ALBERTA WEEKS 
MARY WEIDLER 

SCOTT WILSON 
LOUIS WHISLER 

DWIGHT WILLIAMS 
EDDIE WILLIAMSON 



JOAN WOEHLERT 
LOIS WYGANT 
DONNA ZIKES 
MARILYN ZIMMERMAN 




L!EF HOLGERSON 













SECOND SEMESTER 

and 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 



THOMAS JUDD 

ARNOLD KAMMON 




GARY KNAAK 

JOHN LAVANCHY 
PAUL LINGLE 



JOHN MACOLL 

NORENE MENNINGEN 
CAROL MILLER 



SHARON OSTMAN 
CAREL PRATER 

CHARLES STICKLEN 



ERNEST TOMORDE 
NEAL VOLK 



ELLEN WORTH 







Maytag Gymnasium — A building of many moods and spirits. 



MAYTAG GYMNASIUM 



Athletic Director Don Odle 



Built in 1931 Maytag Gymnasium is used probably 
for more and varied activities than any other 
building on campus. In addition to being the scene 
of many athletic events, such things as registra- 
tion, class parties, Youth Conference and com- 
mencement activities are held in this building. 
Moments of decision, joy and sorrow come from 
the hearts of all who enter this ever-useful campus 
site. 





Earl Craven 

Head Coach 



Winston Smith 

Assistant Coach 




FOOTBALL 



105 



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TAYLOR'S GRIDIRON BEST 




Front row; l-r: J. Key, L. Jackson, I. Thompson, J. Lantz, J. King, Captain H. Hansel, R. Farley, W. Bajder, R. Hackett, B. Jordan, 

T. Abraham. 
Second row: A. Hansen, manager; R. Hamilton, H. Mcintosh, R. Attwater, D. Thompson, D. Guthrie, J. Johnson, C. Kimes, 

G. Shell Jr., B. Rapson. 
Third row: B. Davis, D. Foster, J. Oswalt, D. Rohm, N. Gould, L. Schwartzfager, D. Adams, S. Delcamp, T. Curtis. 
Fourth row: Assistant Coach Smith, R. Rice, F. Pomeroy, L. Fuhrer, W. Roth, P. Reiff, D. Williams, D. Curtis, D. Gustafson, 

T. Webb, Coach Craven. 



This year's Trojan team composed the finest football squad in the history of the school. After the 
first seven games, Taylor was the state's only undefeated team. In the opening thriller Taylor came 
from behind a 14-28 deficit to defeat Bluffton. This opening victory was followed by two 26-0 
triumphs over Franklin and West Virginia State. In the battle of undefeated squads Glenn Schell's 
run proved to give us the margin of victory. The following week the Asiatic flu became the first victor 
over the Trojan squad. During the postponement of the homecoming encounter with Hanover until 
the end of the season, Taylor got back on their winning ways by squeezing out victories over Central 
State of Ohio and Indiana Central. Defiance College became the seventh victim of the winning 
Trojans. 



108 



They seldom get by Key. 

Hansel sees daylight against 
Manchester. 

Captain Hansel leads attack at 
Anderson. 




Gloom overshadows the 


Trojan 


bench. 




SEPTEMBER 




14 Bluffton 


32-28 


21 Franklin 


26- 


28 West Virginia State 


26- 


OCTOBER 




5 Anderson 


13- 7 


12 Central State 


14- 7 


26 Indiana Central 


19-13 


NOVEMBER 




2 Defiance 


18- 


9 Manchester 


13-13 


16 Hanover 


6-26 







The Spartans and the men of Troy scramble for the pigskin. 



The Manchester game was the season's 
biggest heartache. As the final gun sounded 
the ball lay within one foot of the Man- 
chester end zone. The tie, coupled with the 
defeat at the hands of Hanover in the final 
game, knocked the Trojans into a third-place 
finish in the HCC. 



Your guess is as good as ours! 




Schell cuts corner for vital yardage 



110 





HUBERT HANSEL, Captain 

Most Valuable Player 

Fullback 




GLENN SCHELL 

Mi-Conference Halfback 



DAVE ADAMS 

All-Conference End 



hmmBH 




RAY FARLEY 

All-Conference Tackle 




Our Little Ail-American 
BOB DAVIS 

All-Conference Guard 

NAIA All-American 

Williamson Poll 




TED CURTIS 

Conference Honorable 
Mention, Center 




The newly crowned queen, escorted across the stage, commences her big weekend of activities. 





The new marching band forms the symbolic "T. 



The Homecoming program was initiated by the 
crowning of the queen on Friday night. 
Although the band did its part in making it a 
memorable afternoon, the football team failed 
to cooperate. With the team making a valiant 
last-minute drive for the end zone, time ran 
out with only one foot separating them from 
the winning touchdown. A dejected Home- 
coming crowd walked from the field as the 
Trojans were forced to settle for a 13-13 tie. 



Queen Naomi addresses the Homecoming crowd. 



112 




f" i 







Miss Naomi Metzger 



HOMECOMING QUEEN 



113 




Prize winning freshman float 



Sophomore's second place winner 



Junior float 



Senior float 




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£T n* *»Q T ' 




Don Odle 

Head Coach 




Bill Fisher 

Asst. Coach 



BASKETBALL 



115 




Kneeling, l-r.: J. Allred, D. Townsend, O. Reese. Standing: P. Schug, N. Gould, R. Smith, J. Dahl, G. 
Glass, L. Slain, R. Jenkinson, J. King, P. Speece. 



The Trojans faced numerous obstacles during the 
course of the season. Lack of height was one 
reason for the Trojans' not being in the thick of 
the conference race. During the latter part of the 
season injuries to George Glass and Dave Town- 
send were other contributing factors. Despite these 
setbacks, the team experienced moments of glory. 



Nov. 21 




Dec. 



Jan. 



Counterclockwise: R. Yeutter, R. Bahr, M. Dillinger, M. Smith. 



Feb. 



Mar. 



26 
30 
3 
7 
10 
14 
17 
27 



30 

2 

3-4 



11 

14 

18 

25 

28 

1 

8 

11 

15 

22 

1 



23 Richmond Tourney 

Marian 

Earlham 

Anderson 

Goshen (H) 

Cedarville (T) 

Bunker Hill (H) 

Manchester (T) 

Tri-State (H) 

Indiana Central (H) 

Franklin (T) 
■28 Paul Bunyan Tourney 

Minn. Concordia 

Bemidji State 

Northwestern 

Bethel 

William Penn Tourney 

Central State 

Coe 

Anderson (T) 

Manchester (H) 

Hanover (T) 

Huntington (T) 

Wheaton (H) 

Wilberforce (H) 

Indiana Central (T) 

Franklin (H) 

Anderson (H) 

Hanover (H) 

Calvin (T) 



116 




The scoreboard revealed the Trojans in one of their moments. 



Jerry Allred lets fly against Anderson. 



The Trojans opened their season by placing sec- 
ond in the Richmond City Tournament. After de- 
feating Marian of Indianapolis and host Earlham 
they bowed to Anderson in the finale. The 
diminutive Trojans started the regular season with 
lopsided victories over Goshen, Cedarville and 
Bunker Hill Air Force Base. Their first regular sea- 
son defeat came on Manchester's home court. They 
topped the century mark in defeating Goshen and 
Tri-State. One of the high points of the season was 
the Trojans four point victory over arch-rival 
Indiana Central. By virtue of this victory the 
Trojans stood 8-2 before Christmas vacation. 






So many men after one little basketball. 



All-American Mel Peterson fails to block shot. 



Our Jenkinson and Raven's Steinke do the ballet. 



An eight game tour was conducted through 
Minnesota and Iowa during Christmas vacation. 
The Trojans played in two tournaments, winning 
one and losing the other. In the Paul Bunyan 
Tourney they lost close games to Minnesota 
Concordia and Bemidji State. Between the two 
tourneys they split two games. Playing a much 
better brand of ball the Trojans emerged trium- 
phant in the William Penn Tourney. The Trojans 
dropped three of their next four games including 
their second loss to Anderson. 




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) 





Now what do I do? 



Who's side are you on anyway? 




Nelson Gould grabs the ball as he hops through space. 



119 




Everyone waits expectantly as Jenkinson shoots. 



Is Schug reaching for the moon? 




The Trojans turned in one of their finest perform- 
ances against the nation's number one small 
college team; however, the Crusaders from 
Wheaton pulled away in the second half to 
104-73 victory. After losing to Indiana Central 
and Wilberforce, the Trojans won an overtime 
thriller from Franklin by a score of 96-95. In the 
final three, disaster struck as the Trojans fell to 
Anderson, Hanover, and Calvin by lopsided scores. 
The Trojans concluded the season with a 13-14 
record. 




Reece awaits with open arms. 



Gould gets tip from Hanover player. 




Jack King "muscles in" in a futile attempt to grab the rebound. 



121 



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Kneeling, l-r.: L. Whistler, J. King, D. Leveille, D. Condon, B. Biberstein. Standing: S. Delcamp, B. Ringen- 
berg, R. Rice, E. Tomford, Coach Fisher, D. Leigh, D. Mettee, L. Slain, P. Speece. 



The Varsity farm club was hard hit by draft calls 
from the parent team this season. No less than 
four or five players who could have represented 
the B-team were used regularly or often by the 
Varsity. Playing spotty ball throughout most of 
the season, the B-team was able to salvage only 
one victory. This win came over Spring Arbor by 
a 59-58 score. During the remainder of the 
season they dropped games to Manchester, Ander- 
son, Indiana Central, Franklin, and Grace Sem- 
inary. 




It's two points for the "B's" as Ringenberg scores. 



122 






Everybody whoops it up as the Trojans score again. 



As the team hits the road, the echo of a rousing send-off rings in their ears. 








VENTURE FOR VICTORY 



Five Venture for Victory teams have gone to 
various parts of the world to present Christ by 
the means of basketball evangelism. On the five 
previous ventures almost two million people have 
heard the story of salvation. The phenomenal 
record which these teams have compiled shows 
375 wins and four losses. This year's Venture for 
Victory team was cited in the House of Repre- 
sentatives by Representative John V. Beamer of 
Indiana. The sixth Venture for Victory team will 
play games and conduct meetings in Hawaii, 
Korea, Japan, Formosa, Hong Kong, South Viet 
Nam, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines. 



Jack Mount 

University of Southern 
California 



Roger Jenkinson 

Taylor University 



Venture for Victory teammate 



124 





Joe Grabill presents the "unsearchable riches. 



>ld postgame meeting. 





Ed Beck 

University of Kentucky 

"Tink" Van Patton 
Temple University 

Jack King 
Taylor University 




Dressed in native uniforms, several squad mem- 
bers sing in the native tongue. 



The team shows the form that helped them 
compile their outstanding record. 




126 



TRACK 




There's plenty of grit in each step. 




Coach Bill Fisher 



127 







Record breaking form is displayed 
by "Tiny" Davis. 



"Woody" Blaker makes the big leap. 



'Marty" Hess takes off with a flash . . . sets sail . . . and comes to a thundering stop . . 





128 




First row; l-r; S. Delcamp, B. Jordan, captain; C. Turner, W. Blaker, D. Bowman. Second row: Coach 
Fisher, M. Hess, R. Smith, T. Titus, T. Curtis, S. Bassett, K. Robbins, C. Prater, B. Bruce, manager. 



R. Van Damn lets fly with the discus. 




April 


15 


33 


Anderson 


96 




22 


37 


Manchester 
Indiana Central 


76 

38 




26 


72 y 2 


Indiana Tech 
Earlham 


49y 2 
40 




29 


39 


Manchester 


92 


May 


3 


33% 


Manchester 
Franklin 


100 
20 




10 


4th 


Earlham Relays 






13 


64 V 2 


Anderson 
Franklin 


65 y 2 
37 




17 


19 


CONFERENCE 

Hanover 

Anderson 

Manchester 

Indiana Central 

Franklin 


72 

58 
42 
24 
10 



129 




The bar is cleared by D. Cuthbertson. 



B. Jordan makes vault with room to span 




The 1958 track team proved its ability by setting 
five new school standards during the course of 
the season. The school mile relay record was 
topped twice. The final mark was 3:32.6. This 
record breaking team was composed of Ted Curtis, 
Ray Smith, Woody Blaker, and Clayton Turner. 
Clayton Turner broke the 440 yard dash with a 
time of 50.9 seconds in the conference meet. Ray 
Smith topped the 880 yard run with a time of 
2:00.1. Other standards were set by Carl Prater, 
2.00.1. Another standard was set by Bob Davis, 
42'4" in the shot put. 



It's Delcamp over the barrier. 



130 




The Trojans got the track season off to a slow 
start as they bowed to Anderson in a dual meet 
and finished third behind Manchester and Indiana 
Central. In their first meet on their home cinder 
path the Trojans knocked off Indiana Tech and 
Earlham in a three way battle. Manchester proved 
too much for the Trojans as the Spartans were 
victorious in a dual and also a triangular meet 
with the locals. In the Earlham Relays at Richmond, 
the team finished fourth following Anderson; Find- 
lay, Ohio; and Indiana Central. Although they 
set three new school marks in their final en- 
counter before the conference meet, Anderson 
topped them in a heartbreaker by one point. 



R. Smith battles with an opponent in the 880. 




J. Okeson, L. Terdal, W. Blaker break from the Starting blocks. 



131 





■■PHP 
W. Blaker breaks the tape with another victory. 



Could this be the winning throw? 



Although the Trojans finished fifth in the con- 
ference meet with 19 points, there were several 
bright spots. Clayton Turner captured first place 
honors in the 440-yard dash with his school 
record breaking time. Several other underclass- 
men copped points in this meet, which seems to 
point to a bright future. 




T. Curtis passes the baton to R. Smith in method that helps set new school mark. 



132 




First row; l-r; D. Rohm, manager; P. Speece, G. Marr, L. Jackson, I. Thompson, J. Matsudo, S. Creut. 
Second row: D. Ross, W. Samson, P. Flickinger, B. Trout, P. Hill, J. Smith, R. Bell, T. Spears, Coach 
Craven. Third row: L. Slain, R. Jenkinson, N. Volk, D. Williams, N. Gould, R. Rice, H. Young. 




Coach Earl Craven 



BASEBALL 



133 




The worm's eye view of the bullpen. 




Taylor 







McKendree 


2 




2 


St. Louis 


5 


Huntington 


3 


Manchester 


3 







Ball State 


2 


Anderson 


7 




11 


Huntington 


1 


Indiana Centra 


5 




9 


Franklin 


3 




1 
1 


Hanover 



Opponent 

6 
5 
10 

6 
2 
4 
5 
4 
9 
4 
4 
2 
1 
5 
4 



The camera seeks refuge behind the screen. 



134 




Thompson rounds first on an extra base knock against Anderson. 



IVJ 





X 



■ . 



Pitcher B. Trout watches the out- 



Trojan runners advance on a two-base hit. 



135 




It looks like a Trojan out as the catcher awaits the grab. 



With only two games remaining on the schedule, 
the baseball team was within striking distance of 
the conference championship. As a result of their 
double loss to Hanover, the Trojans finished in 
a three-way tie for second place. Double wins 
over Huntington and Franklin highlighted the 
season which showed seven wins and nine losses. 



S. Creutz takes the throw to make the putout. 



No headlines for him — batting practice pitcher. 



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Cross Country Coach Ron Housaman 




Tennis Coach Bill Fisher 




Golf Coach Don Odle 



MINOR SPORTS 



137 




L-r: J. Goss, D. Bowman, captain; J. McCurry, P. Shug, E. Christiansen, R. Housaman, coach; D. 
Williams. 



CROSS COUNTRY 




-Jfe 




-*>.•«£.-' 



Captain Bowman leads J. Goss in a brisk workout. 



138 



The Taylor Harriers enjoyed an improved season. 
The highlight of the cross country season came 
with the upset of the highly touted Anderson squad. 
The team lost close meets to both Manchester 
and Indiana Central. The flu caused cancella- 
tion of three meets. The team fluttered and placed 
fifth in the conference. 



Coach Housaman gives final briefing before meet 




TENNIS 







Captain Millikan lets fly with a vicious shot. 



L-r: P. Flickinger, T. Spears, P. Millikan, captain; 
T. Hyldahl, Coach Fisher. 



The Trojan tennis squad copped fifth place in the 
conference meet. Despite the flu epidemic and 
the cancellation of matches they managed to down 
Franklin in regular competition. The team will be 
hurt by the loss of Captain Paul Millikan and 
Tom Spears. 



Winningest twosome geared for action. 





wmm 








What is attracting their attention? 



. . and down the fairway it sails! 



GOLF 




The duffers opened their short season with two 
victories in their first three matches. They trounced 
Indiana Tech. and Anderson by lopsided scores. 
However, they experienced similar fates at the 
hands of Franklin, Indiana Central, and Earlham. 
In the conference meet, held this year in Indi- 
anapolis, the golf team finished fourth behind 
Indiana Central, Hanover, and Franklin. 



Kneeling; l-r: J. Reynolds, J. Affleck, C. Strick- 
land. Standing; l-r: D. Thompson, F. Baker, Coach 
Odle, Captain J. Johnson, J. Clopton. 



140 



President I. Thompson works on the new clubhouse. 



The usually busy concession stand. 



One of the victorious teams in the T-Club tourney. 



T-CLUB 





Dfficers; l-r: B. Cotner, W. Roth, J. Key, Coach 
Craven, I. Thompson, president; B. Jordan. 




INTRAMURALS 






The front-running sophomores are hard pressed by the seniors. 




This year's intramural schedule consisted of touch 
•football, basketball, and softball. The junior 
class proved victorious in touch football. The Com- 
muters and again the junior class topped their 
respective leagues in basketball competition. How- 
ever, the commuters knocked off the juniors in 
the opening round of the tourney, and went on to 
become basketball champs. In spring softball 
action the freshman, with the help of strong 
hurling, copped the title. 



A typical mad scramble in intramural play. 



142 




* •' \ ' * ; I 



The freshmen end sophomores tangle on the grid- 
iron. 




That vicious cut should produce something. 



Intramural action keeps the officials busy. 




Titus snares a rebound for the freshman class. 




WOMEN'S RECREATION ASSOCIATION 




Seated; l-r: J. Hoff, vice president; S. Gorrell, chaplain. Standing; l-r: J. Schabinger, advisor; 
J. Hartman, president; L. Gruver, secretary-treasurer; M. Ward, publicity chairman. 



"For ye are bought with a price; therefore glorify God in your body, and in your 
spirit, which are God's." I. Cor. 6:20. With this verse in mind the W.R.A. members 
participated in camp-outs, bowling, sledding, roller skating and other activities. 
The culmination of the year's program was the Awards Banquet. 



144 




Go on, I'll follow you! 




The "other-half" show their husbands how to play ball as they challenge the 
champion girls' intramural basketball team. 



145 




Row 1: J. Hartman, S. McCune. Row 2: N. Rolle, R. Shiveley, J. Haaland, M. Iha, 
S. Peck. Row 3: J. Hoff, J. Price, E. Hansen, E. Barnes, M. Ward, P. Martin, I. Barrett, 
J, Schabinger. 



TROJANES 



Taylor's basketball girls turned in an undefeated 
season this year, winning eight games. The team 
was co-captained by Janet Hartman and Sue Mc- 
Cune. Sue McCune, Sara Peck and Pat Martin did 
the bulk of point-getting while the defense did a 
superb job in limiting the opponents score total 
to 263 against their own 439. Their good con- 
sistent playing brought a rewarding season. 




Miss Jean Schabinger is the competent leader of 
the women's physical education department. 



146 





Get that tip. 



The crucial moment. 




Skill, energy, and love of sport equals a Trojane. 



147 



WALK THE WAY 



The 1958 Youth Conference marked the 25th 
Anniversary of Youth Conference at Taylor Uni- 
versity. This year brought 1200 youth swarming 
on the campus for a week-end of spiritual chal- 
lenge. Assisted by the core-cabinet composed of 
23 representatives, other students participated in 
assigned Youth Conference activities and respon- 
sibilities. "Walk the Way" beckoned young people 
to the Christian way of life and headlined the 
theme of the conference. 




Ruth Ralston from Clinton, Indiana, better known 
as the "Announcement Girl," was one of the co- 
chairmen. 



Youth Conference Cabinet, l-r: Front row: F. Luthy, E. Poe, advisors; R. Ralston, B. Cotner, M. Foura, 
I. Thompson, A. Hansen. Second row: H. Rechsteiner, L. Stern, M. Bailey, J. Vanzant, J. Sheets, L. 
Martin, J. Huffman, C. Key, S. Newhard. Back row: D. Meier, O. lehmann, G. Atha, J. Key, 
C. Fraley, T. Rummney, B. Tucker, S. Beach, D. Bontrager. 




148 




The other faithful Youth Conference leader is 
Robert Cotner from Kendallville, Indiana. 




The A Cappella Choir sings "Beautiful Saviour." 




There's always room for one more seeker. 



149 





Paris Reidhead, our Youth Conference evangelist, 
presented well the way to walk. 



Dick Hillis, inspiring missionary speaker. 



HI'". I5I 






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Youth and students gather in Maytag gymnasium for a time of song and inspiration as Harold 
Jackson sings a word of testimony to the assembled audience. 



150 




The long way, the hard way, to the dining hal 



Real he-men?? 




For by grace are ye saved through faith . . . Ephesians 2:8. 



151 



TROJAN PLAYERS 




The Trojan Players group is the dramatics or- 
ganization on the campus. Its purpose is not only 
in the line of acting but for experience in all 
of the areas of play production. Some of these 
are make-up work, staging, lighting, publicity, 
props and directing. The productions which the 
Trojan Players presented this school year were 
"Eternal Life," "Xingu," "Three Pills in a Bottle," 
The Robe, A Christmas Carol, The Late Christopher 
Bean, and Enemy of the People. The organization 
has been in its second successful year. Member- 
ship is now on a point system and is gained by 
participation in productions during the proba- 
tion period. 



The Robe 
'But master, The Robe can help you." 




Officers; l-r: R. Valutis, vice president; J. Haaland, secretary; B. Jordan, president, and L. Martin, 
treasurer (not pictured). 



152 




'The Late Christopher Bean" 
'Oh, now really, Susie — " 



"I'm only trying to help you. 




"Three Pills in a Bottle' 



153 



FINE ARTS AND LYCEUM SERIES 



The pursuance of the Fine Arts is important in 
everyone's life, but even more important in the 
life of a Christian student. A liberal arts educa- 
tion, to be what it is named, must expose the 
student to the finer things of life. 




The Davies of Canada. 




Taylor can also draw on some of the fine campus talent for edification. 



154 




The "Messiah" sets the stage for the Christmas season. 





Eugene List and the Knickerbocker Players. 



The music recital of Jean Watson. 



155 




The lineup is a must before the grand march. 



GRADUATION 




An honorary degree for 
English guest, W. J. Smart. 





The last long line. 



Diplomas — assembly line style 




The burning of the Ayres Library mortgage. 



The President's pastor and our president. 



157 




A town in itself. 



Fairlane Village and the Trailer Court provide 
the home for the married students and their 
families on the campus. 




There is no rest for the weary! 




William Kendall, mayor of the 
Trailer Court. 



158 



The couples living on the campus find much en- 
joyment in fellowship with their neighbors and in 
their "Wedding Band" Society. 




Talking over the days work. 




It's a man's world! 



159 




Ayres Alumni Memorial Library 



RECORDS OF TIME 



Every student finds valuable aid in the Taylor 
Library which contains 45,000 bound volumes 
plus many pamphlets. The library is supplied 
with reading and reference rooms, plus projection, 
committee, listening and typing rooms. An attrac- 
tive faculty lounge is also found in this important 
building. 



Ever willing to help are the head librarians, Alice 
Holcombe and Lois Weed. 





o 



~-m 




Students keep up to date with the latest news. 




The motions of study. 



161 




The audio-visual department houses many useful 
and essential devices to make our education 
more real to us. Film and opaque projectors, slide 
machines, and various other equipment consti- 
tute this program. 



An essential person with projection equipment. 



Buried in the stacks. 





I wish they would write so I could read it! 




Another book goes on record. 



The record room — a good atmosphere 
for quiet reading. 



163 




Student Council members: seated; D. Cuthbertson, president; B. Godsey, T. Krein, M. Hess, vice presi- 
dent; B. Bowers, B. Egeberg, secretary, J. King. Standing: Dr. Green, advisor; T. Hyldahl, R. Valutis, 
Sam Delcamp. 




STUDENT COUNCIL 



The student council provides opportunity for the 
interchange of views, relative to any matter of 
campus concern, between students and faculty. 
This year's council has labored diligently in aid- 
ing the establishment of a well-rounded campus- 
community life. 



Duane Cuthbertson, Mr. Student Body President, 
has succeeded in accomplishing much this year. 



164 



This page sponsored by your Student Council 




The Christmas Banquet 



Come on you guys! Stack up another point for your class. 




...p. . ., .. „ 





STUDENT JUDICIARY 



The purpose of the Student Judiciary is to pro- 
mote and enforce the Honor System. The duties 
of the five students elected to the judiciary deal 
with chapel cuts and campus misdemeanors. 



Discussing important problems 




L-r: W. Roth, Chief Justice; E. Hosman, H. Young, M. Wilcox, D. Bontrctger, J. Huffma 
Standing: Dr. Paton Yoder, advisor. 



This page sponsored by your Student Council 



166 



INTER- CLASS 
COUNCIL 



This group has played an increasingly important 
role in the policies, life, and activities of the 
campus. Composed of the class presidents and 
one other representative from each class, this body 
has had charge of such programs as Class Day, 
Freshman Initiation, and Move-Up Day. 




"Shag" Day Picnic 



V 

I '1 ( 




Seated: C. Fricke, J. Vanzant, P. Orem, E. Hosman. Standing: R. Beaverson, D. Cuthbertson, 
R. Jordan, P.lngerham, B. Ringenberg. 



This page sponsored by your Student Council 



167 




SYMPOSIUM 
DIALECTICUM 



This humanities discussion group is now in its 
third year of existance. It has added much in the 
line of intellectual stimulation and advancement 
of Taylor. It is a select group whose members have 
a scholastic average of at least 2.0. Membership 
is attained through invitation exclusively. Papers 
and discussions presented at the meetings range 
from campus problems to philosophical concepts 
with the purpose of provoking deeper thought and 
original ideas. 



Standing, l-r: Dr. Rediger, advisor; H. Rechsteiner, 
P- Martin, Dr. Yoder, advisor; seated: T. Hydalh, 
president. 




Papers, papers and more papers. 



168 




Standing, l-r.: Professor H. Lee, advisor; M. Starkweather, L. Turbin, S. Kuhnle, 
D. Kemp, R. Ralston, president. 



ENGLISH CLUB 

"Literature is the greatest of all sources of refined 
pleasure, and one of the great uses of a liberal 
education is to enable us to enjoy that pleasure." 

T. H. Huxley. 
Members of the English Club find that they do 
enjoy literature as they attend unique programs 
featuring films, lectures, skits, and discussions. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 
CLUB 

Student interest has been stimulated in the fields 
of history, social science, and sociology by an 
effective program based upon national and inter- 
national affairs. The club's projects included 
forums on segregation, Russia's satellite and the 
sponsoring of a spring political rally. 




Standing, l-r: M. Hess, president; R. Freese, Dr- 
Yoder, advisor; R. Beaverson, seated: S. Newhard. 



169 




SCIENCE HALL 



As its name designates, the Science Hall is the 
campus site of almost all work of a scientific 
nature except chemical. Within its white frame 
walls are found the botany, zoology, and physics 
laboratories. Behind Science Hall is the new Radi- 
ation Lab. This new project was made possible 
by designated funds from the Atomic Energy 
Commission making Taylor the second such privil- 
edged school in Indiana. 




Now if it all turns out like the professor said. 



170 




Now you press this button here . 




he cloud chamber seems to hold them spellbound 




Believe it or not, it works! 




Dr. Nussbaum and a laboratory assistant examine a new Geiger counter for the laboratory. 



171 




Illustrations such as the one at the left are of vital 
importance to those students pursuing biological fields 
of interest. Contact with good textbook materials as 
this, along with the many other educational experiences 
pictured on these pages, are the foundations of a sound 
biological course of study. 



The teacher's interest in the individual — key to a small college educational experience. 





B^ gt^ 




Students from botany class try out their green thumbs during lab period. 



Miss Poe's ornathology class for "the birds. 



Laboratory work and field trips are im- 
portant factors in good biological science 
courses. In both the botanical and zoological 
fields, Taylor strives to present an ever- 
improving and balanced program. 




SCIENCE CLUB 

The Science Club purposes to help the members 
grasp a better understanding of the major science 
fields, and to give them an opportunity for par- 
ticipation in study and research to supplement 
their classroom material. The outstanding ac- 
tivity of the club was its sponsorship of the first 
annual Science Lecture Series. 



Dr. Charles Shilling led the Science Lecture Series, 
dealing mainly with atomic energy. 





L-r: Professor Krueger, advisor; C. Ford, vice-president; B. Boycott, president; B. Johnson, social 
chairman; D. Koch, secretary-treasurer. 



174 




L-r.: Dr. Nussbaum, advisor; W. Doell, J. Hayes, L. Kinzer, president; J. Reynolds, B. Hughes. 



ALPHA PI IOTA 



The name, Alpha Pi lota, meaning "Followers of 
the Great Physician," was selected as the name of 
the new pre-medical society. Fostering scholarship, 
fellowship and mutual interests in the medical 
profession, Alpha Pi lota has already made a 
mark on campus. 




A Christian doctor speaks on home missions. 



175 




FAIRLANE VILLAGE 

This is the home of married students and some 
single fellows. These housing units make comfort- 
able and attractive homes for their occupants. 



Sack Time 




And all is still. 



EDUCATIONAL 
UNITS 



The ever-growing Taylor added classroom 
space by securing these educational units. 
Besides general classes, the business and 
foreign language departments are housed 
here. 




What would we do without Camp Atterbury? 




Modern language students 
make use of the new listen- 
ing laboratory. 



Language Club; seated: Professor H. Greenleaf, 
advisor; A. Berndt, N. Oakes; standing: A. Han- 
sen, president; D. Yoder. 




Business Club; l-r: R. Sumney, president; D. 
Thompson, Professor D. VanValkenburg, ad- 
visor; J. Jones, S. Wilson, L. Jones. 





Ed Camp Memorial Dining Hall 



BUILDING FOR THE FUTURE 



The students attending school this year saw progress in action as the new food 
center and men's residence hall slowly took shape before their eyes. This develop- 
ment program is the first in the twenty-five year series, and will cost over five 
million dollars. 



178 





The skeleton of the food center. 



And the walls slowly rise. 



A feeling of space and vastness is felt as one stands inside the half-globe dining hall. 





Will they stay up there? 




The Men's Residence Hall — a symbol of progress. 





Is it really moving, or am I seeing things? 



New halls of ivy. 



The past with the new present. 




A PLAN FOR THE FUTURE 

The buildings at the right are the first step in the Taylor 
expansion program, which is expected to span over 
the next twenty years. The ultimate expense for this 
progression will approach five million dollars, and in- 
cludes the erection of fifteen new buildings. With an 
eye on the future and its increased enrollment, Taylor 
University is stepping out in faith to meet the needs of 
Christian higher education. 




HI PRESENT BUILDINGS 
[Ujj| PROPOSED BUILDING 





























Presldtnl 
l__ 


Homt 










The new men's dormitory and the Ed Camp 
Memorial Dining Hall. 



r 



iiiiiiil 




Standing, l-r: Joshua Howwell, Wilber Huntzinger, Ken Carnblin, Joyce Rohrer, David Wilds, Paul 
Boyer, Charles Clouse, Ralph Boyd. Kneeling, l-r: Louis Swander, Merritt Strange. 



MAINTENANCE - INSIDE - FORCE 



Charlie gives a clip job. 




Chief, Ralph Boyd, keeps a check on things. 





Work advances on the new Radiation Lab. 



School can operate without anyone of its com- 
ponents, except maintenance crew. You name it, 
they can do it. They are probably best known for 
the habit of passing out little pieces of pink 
paper. 




All this — and it cuts grass, too. 



Their business has been picking up. 





A » 
P f 



;*-. - £.# 



Advertising 



K.-^f- '%m 


*-^P>-.i.- ^ ' W$ a vM ^^ *^. ■ 



■■■>!"" 









and Indices 



Bus. Mgr. Gene Rupp 
Asst. Bus. Mgr. Ron Bible 



COMPLIMENTS OF 


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Upland Grain Co. 


Bowman Construction 


Phone 41 


Co., Inc. 


Upland Indiana 


GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS 
SINCE 1895 






Marion, Indiana 


COMPLIMENTS 


We are proud to have a part in 


Milton ' s 


your building program. 


MEN'S AND BOYS' WEAR 


Library, Dormitory, Food Center 


Marion, Indiana 


Compliments of 




OSBORN-MIDWEST PAPER 


Our Congratulations to Taylor University 


CORP. 


On Your Splendid Building Program 


Marion Indiana 


HILLMAN'S 




Ft. Wayne, Indiana 

"SINCE 1921" 




Moon's Drive In 




Complete Dining and Curb Service 


Food Service Equipment and Seating 


The Brightest Spot on the By-Pass 


For College Restaurants and Hospitals 


Marion Phone 2652 





188 



Faculty and Staff Directory 



Andrews, Jennie 

Barkman, Paul 
Bell, Jean 
Bergwall, Evan H. 
Bollinger, Robert 
Boyd, Ralph D. 
Boyer, Paul 
Bruce, Lois 
Butz, Hazel 

Camp, Harold 
Carson, Peggy 



16, 34 

16, 80, 88 

1, 9, 10, 47, 70 

184, 185 
184 



Cleveland, Wilbur 








11,13 


, 14 


Cline, 


Virginia 










15 


Clouse, 


Charles 










184 


Clouse, 


Florence 












Cotner, 


Norma 










14 


Craven 


, Charline 








52, 


145 


Craven 


, Earl 


16, 74, 


105, 


108 


, 133, 


141 


Craven 


, Everett 










52 


Cross, 


Hildreth 










16 


DeCam 


p, Olive 










15 


Dillon, 


Lorraine 










16 


Dow, Vivian 










16 


Felton, 


David 












Fisher, 


William 


17, 115, 


127, 


129 


, 137, 


139 


Francis, 


, George 










26 


Freese, 


Elizabeth 










15 


Fritzemeier, Hulda 










17 


Green, 


Mary 










17 


Green, 


William 








' 12, 


164 


Greenleaf, Helen 








17, 


177 


Griffith 


, Hazel 













Haakonsen, Ellen 
Hoakonsen, Lillie 
Haines, Meredith 
Harter, Walter 
Herber, Ida 
Holcombe, Alice 
Hostetler, Donald 
Howell, Joshua 
Hunsberger, Lowell 
Huntzinger, Wilbur 

Keller, Paul 
Kelly, Roberta 
Kendall, Marion 
Kessler, Roberta 
Klemm, Robert 
Krueger, Gordon 



53 
17, 21, 22 

14 
160 
184 

184 

184 

13 
17, 56 

15 
17, 51 

18, 23, 174 



Lee, Herbert 
LeShana, David 
Libby, Sandra 
Loewen, Catherine 
Loewen, William 
Luthy, Frederick 

McCormick, Howard 
McCormick, Maxine 
Mahle, Burton 
Martin, Donald 
Miller, Edith 

Nussbaum, Elmer 

Odle, Don 
Olson, Grace 

Patton, Jack 
Poe, Elisabeth 

Rains, Mary 
Rapson, Lois 
Ray, George 
Rediger, Milo 
Rogers, Gloria 
Roye, Frank 
Rupprecht, Arthur 

Schabinger, Jean 
Schroer, Albert 
Shepfer, Dale 
Shippy, Alice 
Slain, Zelma 
Smith, Winston 
Stephenson, Lucille 
Steyer, Hilda 
Strange, Merritt 
Stratton, Mildred 
Swander, Lewis 

VanValkenburg, Dalton 

Wadsworth, Mildred 
Weed, Lois 
Wilds, David 
Wilds, Margaret 
Wise, Donna 
Wolfgang, Carolyn 
Wood, Paul H. 
Wood, Vida 

Yoder, Paton 



18, 31, 


169 


14, 21 


, 38 




27 




18 


18, 38, 


148 




178 


27, 


178 


18 


, 37 




18 




15 


18, 


175 


04, 115, 137, 


140 




13 




19 


19, 


148 



19 
12, 168 

19 
26 

19, 144, 146 

19 
20 
14 

20, 105, 108 

20 

184 

20, 34 

184 

20, 96, 178 

145 
160 
184 

15 
15 
20 
20 

20, 21, 166, 168, 169 



Student Directory 



Abraham, Thomas 
Adams, David 
Affleck, John 
Agar, Ruth 
Allison, Perry 
Allred, Jerry 
Amstutz, Annabelle 
Amstutz, Claudia 
Anderson, Andrew 
Anderson, Elsa 
Anderson, James 
Anderson, Nancy 
Andrews, Sue 





106, 


108 


106, 


, 108, 


1 1 1 




96, 


140 




39, 


96 
96 


58, 


,116, 


1 17 
88 
88 
97 




22, 25, 


, 58 
96 




39 


, 88 



Angerer, Joyce 
Armstrong, Phillip 
Atha, Grayson 
Attwater, Russell 
Augustine, Betty 
Augustine, Wayne 
Ayres, Ruth 

Baarendse, Richard 
Bahr, Roslyn 
Bailey, Martha 
Baker, Floyd 
Barnes, Ellen 





97 




97 


27, 58, 


148 


106, 


108 




88 


35 


, 97 




97 




97 


74, 1 16, 


123 


58, 70, 


148 


58, 


140 




146 



189 



"BLAZERS FOR 
CHRIST" 

CLASS OF '59 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

ROSS SUPPLY CO., INC. 

Distributors of 
Plumbing - Heating - Well Supplies 

PHONE 4855 

Marion, Indiana 


His eye is on the sparrow . . . 
and Swallow-Robin too. 


G. C. MURPHY CO. 

VARIETY STORE 

ON THE SQUARE 

Hartford City Indiana 


HOUSE OF CHAN 

BEST FOOD IN TOWN 

Phone 3057 
Marion Indiana 


Congratulations Seniors 

BIG BUD DRIVE-IN 

Marion Indiana 


REDMOND'S 

DRUGS, PRESCRIPTIONS 
Hartford City, Indiana 


MAGEE-CAMPBELL DORMITORY 

". . . do all to the Glory of God." 
1 Cor. 10:13 


FREEL & MASON DRUG 
COMPANY 

C. B. McDonough - Lester B. Metcalf 
Marion Indiana 


"Let us go into the house of the Lord." 
Psalms 122:1 

THE METHODIST CHURCH 


Miller Motor Sales 

UPLAND, INDIANA 


BEST WISHES 
From 

B. Snell & Son 

Wholesaler & Vending Machine 
Operator 

Hartford City, Indiana 



190 



Bauder, Walter 
Batho, Phyllis 
Bassett, Sheldon 
Barrett, Irene 
Barrett, Verle 
Bayes, Carol 
Beach, Stan 
Beal, Harold 
Beaverson, Roger 
Behr, Janice 



58, 106, 108 

97 

88, 129 

75, 146 

58 

97 

24, 38, 58, 148 

88 

37, 74, 75, 167, 169 



Curtis, Ted 
Cuthbertson, Duane 



1, 106, 108, 1 1 1 

129, 131, 141 

48, 59, 71, 130 

164, 167 



Bell, Ralph 


133 


Bennett, Carolyn 


89 


Bepler, Richard 


97 


Berndt, Audrey 


33, 97, 177 


Berst, Janet 


75 


Biberstein, Robert 


97, 122 


Bible, Ronald 


22, 89 


Bihl, Karen 


25, 89 


Blake, Floyd 




Blaker, Woodley 


24, 37, 97, 128, 129 




131, 132 


Bledsoe, Lois 


39, 51, 97 


Blumer, David 


97 


Boll, Judy 


97 


Bonnette, Terry 


32, 97 


Bontrager, Gordon 


23, 89, 148, 166 


Boothe, Elaine 


31 


Bowers, Betty 


89, 164 


Bowman, David 


75, 129, 138 


Bowman, John 




Boycott, William 


59, 174 


Boyd, Ruth 




Boyer, Alice 




Boyer, Paul 




Boyer, David 




Brain, Joseph 


97 


Brennan, Joanne 


37, 97 


Briggs, Yvonne 


97 


Brose, Martha 


31, 37, 97 


Brown, Beverly 


56, 59 


Brown, Edythe 


37, 89 


Brownsberger, John 


75 


Bruce, Dave 


37, 97 


Bruce, Robert 


96, 129 


Brumbaugh, Marianna 


56 


Brummeler, John 




Brunk, Mary 


97 


Buckles, Sharon 


89 


Burbridge, Richard 


97 


Burritt, Edgar 




Byrer, Joseph 


89 



Canning, Harry 
Carlson, Carolyn 
Carlson, Mary 
Carriker, Wilson 
Carter, Curtis 
Castro, Nelida 
Cheesman, Karen 
Chitwood, Marjorie 
Christensen, Earl 
Clements, Madonna 
Clopton, John 
Closson, Rosalie 
Coburn, Beverly 
Cochran, Lloyd 
Combs, Grace 
Condon, David 
Conwell, Dewaine 
Corts, Beverly 
Cotner, Robert 
Coy, Barbara 
Coyle, Sharon 
Coyner, Carol 
Creutz, Steve 
Crowder, James 
Curtis, Danal 
Curtis, Robert 



59 

48 

51, 59, 97 

89 







98 






98 




98, 


138 
98 
140 




34, 55 


, 89 




37, 


, 89 
59 




37. 


, 75 




98, 


123 
98 


59, 141 


, 148, 


149 
89 
98 
75 


75 


, 133, 


135 




31, 57, 


. 89 


98 


, 106, 


108 



Dahl, Gertrude 




59 


Dahl, James 




60, 116 


Damewood, Darwin 




75 


Davies, Gwendolyn 




60 


Davis, Robert 39, 60, 106, 


108, 111, 128 


Day, Richard 




60 


Delcamp, Samuel 


98, 106, 108, 122, 129 






130, 164 


Dellinger, Mary 




89, 116 


DePue, Lena 




98 


Dilley, Gilbert 




22, 25, 89 


Dilley, Kathleen 




22, 25, 60 


Dillon, Ruth 




75 


Disbennett, Donna 




98 


Dodge, Ralph 




60 


Doell, William 


10 


, 32, 76, 175 


Duffey, Paul 




98 


Dvorak, Robert 




39, 89 


Dzao, Dorathy 




60 


Easterday, Rose 




60 


Eby, Marjorie 




98 


Edmunds, Ruth 




60 


Egeberg, Betty 




76,164 


Ellis, Villa 




98 


Engle, Phyllis 




69 


Ensing, Jemima 




60 


Ensor, Geraldine 




76 


Ensor, Gail 




39, 89 


Erickson, Richard 




23, 90 


Ewbank, Ralph 




90 


Farley, Ramon 


61, 


106, 108, 111 


Fassett, Ronald 




61 


Fleetham, Floyd 




98 


Flickinger, Paul 




90, 133, 139 


Follett, Marilyn 




76 


Forbes, Gary 




98 


Ford, Carol 




25 


Ford, Charles 




90, 106, 174 


Foss, Gary 




98 


Foster, Daniel 




98, 106, 108 


Foster, Doris 






Foura, Marlene 


49 


, 76, 86, 148 


Fox, Earl 




98 


Fraley, Charles 


47,48 


, 53, 71, 148 


Freeman, Daniel 




98 


Freese, Robert 




169 


Frehse, Arlene 




37, 61 


Fricke, Carol 




76, 167 


Fuhrer, Larry 


96, 


98, 106, 108 


Fulcher, Jane 


96, 


98, 106, 108 


Galtord, James 




37, 98 


Garner, Karen 




90 


Garrett, Buck 






Gay, Vernon 




30, 31, 90 


Gehres, David 




90 


Gerig, Merle 




98 


Germaine, Ann 




76 


Glass, George 




61, 116 


Godsey, Betty 


61 


, 70, 72, 164 


Gorrell, Susanne 




55, 76, 144 


Goss, Jerry 




98, 138 


Gould, Nelson 


99, 106 


108,116, 119 
121, 133 


Graham, Kerrie 




31, 76 


Grant, Connie 




99 


Greenleaf, Richard 






Grieser, Joyce 






Griffith, Robert 




61 


Grile, John 




33, 77 


Grubbs, Betty 




99 



191 



BAKED GOODS 

All Varieties 

CALL 

Upland Baking Company 

TRY OUR TASTY ROLLS 
UPLAND INDIANA 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

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in Marion 

Marion, Indiana 
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Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 


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GENERAL INSURANCE 
Upland, Indiana 


Home Service Calls - Radio-TV Supplies 

V & R RADIO-TV SERVICE 

P. O. Bldg. - Box 224 
Phone 6-7635 Upland 



192 



Grubbs, Patsy 
Gruver, Lorelta 
Gullet), Ronald 
Gustafson, David 
Guthrie, Richard 
Gyde, Ralph 



99 

90, 144 

47 

77, 106, 108, 152 

77, 106, 108 

61 



Haakonsen, Ellen 








Haakonsen, Gladys 


37, 38, 74 


, 77 


Haaland, Joan 


90, 


146, 


152 


Habegger, Erma 








Hacked, Ronald 


90 


,106, 


108 


Hall, Joellyn 


39, 51 


, 99, 


154 


Hamilton, Phyllis 






34 


Hamilton, Ralph 






90 


Hamilton, Russell 


53, 61, 77, 


106, 


108 


Hanawalt, Barbara 






99 


Hand, Dorothy 






99 


Hansel, Hubert 


61, 106, 108, 


109, 


111 


Hansen, Adolf 


22, 24 


, 77, 


148 


Hansen, Enid 


33, 


, 77, 


146 


Hansen, Arthur 


27,61, 


108, 


177 


Hansen, Signe 






90 


Harris, Paul 






77 


Hartman, Janet 


77, 


144, 


146 


Harvey, Patricia 








Hatcher, Harold 








Hatfield, Garry 






62 


Havens, Austin 






62 


Hebbert, Audrey 




31 


, 77 


Hefelfinger, Doris 




37 


, 78 


Heinlein, Jane 






99 


Henning, Mary 






90 


Herring, Kay 








Hess, Dona 


39, 62 


, 98 


Hess, Martin 21, 53, 


72, 128, 129, 


164, 


169 


Heiber, Arlene 




25 


, 78 


Hill, Arbin 






62 


Hill, Charles 




90, 


133 


Hill, LaVera 








Hillman, Howard 






90 


Hochstettler, Arthur 






91 


Hoel, William 








Hoff, Joan 


62, 


144, 


146 


Hoffman, Judith 




37 


, 99 


Hoffman, Rodney 




37 


, 91 


Holgerson, Leif 






103 


Hopper, Martha 








Hosman, Elaine 




99, 


167 


Hosman, Jack 








Houseman, Rhinehart 


62, 137, 


138, 


166 


Houser, Duane 






99 


Howard, Eldon 




38, 


, 91 


Howland, Anita 






91 


Howland, Carol 
Howland, Charles 






91 








Hoyes, John 




91, 


175 


Huffman, Janet 


91, 


148, 


166 


Huffman, Richard 








Hughes, Bradley 




62, 


175 


Huitema, Walter 






62 


Hunt, Stephen 








Hyldahl, Thorn 


49, 139, 


164, 


168 


lha. May 


39 


, 62, 


146 


Ingerham, Phillip 


88, 


, 91, 


167 


Innes, Neil 






91 


Irey, Garth 








Isaac, Verna 









Jackson, Harold 
Jackson, Malcolm 
Jackson, Otis 
Jackson, Robert F. 
Jackson, Robert L. 
Jacobson, Barbara 
Javor, Dorothy 
Jenkinson, Roger 
Jessiman, Edwin 



37, 78 

91 

91,106, 108, 133 

91 

39, 91 

99 

37, 99 

116, 118, 120, 124, 133 

39 



34, 48, 62 
129, 130 



Jessiman, John 
Johnson, Beverly 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Mary 
Johnston, Ruby 
Joiner, Jeanette 
Joiner, Sarah 
Jones, James 
Jones, Laurence 
Jones, Leon 
Jones, Roger 
Jordan, Geraldine 
Jordan, Robert 

Jorg, Paul 
Jorg, Wilma 
Josephs, Annetta 
Judd, Thomas 
Juillard, Lonnie 
Juillard, Phillip 
Justice, Charlotte 
Justice, Pinkie 



Kammon, Arnold 

Kaputo, Elie 

Kaufmann, Marjorie 

Kelley, Marjorie 

Kemp, David 

Kendall, William 

Kesler, Jay 

Kessler, Roberta 

Key, Christine 

Key, James 53, 78, 107, 108 

Kimes, Charles 

King, Jack 

King, Janet 

King, Jim 

Kinkead, Jane 

Kinzer, LeRoy 

Kissane, Michael 

Klohck, George 

Knaak, Gary 

Knobeloch, Wanda 

Knoll, Beverly 

Knudsen, Marilyn 

Koch, Delia 

Kocher, Doris 

Kokame, Takako 

Komp, Marjorie 

Krein, Gertrude 

Krider, Dian 

Kuehnle, Constance 

Kuehnle, Shiela 

Kuhn, Hubert 

Kuhn, Suzanne 

Kutchen, Barbara 

Laberday, Nancy 
[amnion, Judy 
London, John 
Lantz, John 
Larsen, Ellis 
larsen, Rolf 
Larson, David 
Larson, Delores 
Larson, Grace 
Lauber, Katherine 
Laughlin, Eleanor 
Lavanchy, John 
Leader, Mary 
Legg, Jane 
Lehmann, Orlan 
Lehmer, Marian 
Leigh, Donald 
Leland, Aleda 
Leslie, Mary 
Leveille, David 
Lewis, Nancy 
Libby, Douglas 



78, 174 
37, 62, 107, 108, 140 







78 






63 






99 






91 




91, 


177 




99, 


177 
62 
62 


62, 70, 


72, 


107 


, 141, 


152, 


167 


37, 39 


, 99 


37, 38 


, 78 






91 






103 






99 






91 




49 


, 63 
99 

103 
99 
91 


31, 


, 78, 


169 


24, 49, 


78, 


158 




24 


, 63 




63, 


148 


, 109, 


141, 


148 




107 


,108 


116, 


121, 


125 



92, 107, 108, 122, 164 
99 

63, 175 

78 

103 

99 

92 
56, 79, 174 
92 
63 
99 
92, 164 

63 

63, 70, 169 

99 

48, 56, 64 

100 

10 
37, 100 

79,107, 108 

49, 64 

23, 64 

25, 92 

79 

56, 92 

25, 64 

103 

51, 100 

30, 64 

64, 148 
33, 92 

37, 100, 122 

79 

100 

92, 122 

100 



193 




"The final result of true education is not a selfish scholar, 
nor a scornful critic of the universe, but an intelligent and faith- 
ful citizen who is determined to put all his powers at the service 
of his country and mankind." 

— Henry Van Dyke 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



TAYLOR UNIVERSITY 



194 



liechty, Nancy 
Lindgren, Nancy 
Lingle, Bud 
Linhart, Dale 
Loewen, William 
Lorenzana, Clarita 
Lorenzana, Rose Marie 
Louthain, John 
Lundquist, Arlene 

Macall, John 

McBride, Doris 

McCarty, David 

McClanahan, Joseph 

McCune, Sue 

McCurry, John 

McGarvey, Kenneth 

McGeath, Thomas 

McGranor, Thomas 

Mcintosh, Herbert 

McKinley, Loran 

McMahan, Priscilla 

Malson, Ruth 

Marr, Eugene 

Marshall, Myrna 

Martin, Patricia 48, 

Marshall, Sophia 

Martin, Evelyn 

Martin, Lois 

Martin, Miriam 

Mathisen, Howard 

Matsudo, Jinchi 

Matthews, Margaret 

Mattson, Jayne 

Maurer, Greg 

Maynard, Mary 

Medvidofsky, Leah 

Meier, Dwight 

Meier, Patricia 

Meier, Paul 

Melton, Donald 

Menningen, Norene 

Merz, Raymond 

Mettee, Dave 

Metzger, Charles 

Metzger, Naomi 

Middleton, Nancy 

Miller, Carol 

Miller, Gretchen 

Millikan, Eloise 

Millikan, Paul 

Moennig, Gloria 

Moller, Vera 

Montgomery, Ann 

Moore, Alfred 

Moore, Marlene 

Moore, Sandra 

Moore, Shirley 

Morgan, Joyce 

Morgan, Robert 

Moyer, Paul 

Murdoch, Cleo 

Negley, Jean 
Newhard, Anna 
Newhard, Sue 
Nishihara, Edna 
Niver, Millard 
Norrenberns, Nancy 
Norris, Arthur 

Oakes, Nannette 
Okesson, John 
Orem, Patricia 
Oren, James 
Orne, Janet 
Osborn, Sharon 
Ostman, Sharon 



92 

49, 55, 64 

103 

25, 74, 79 

64 

30, 92 

37, 97 

64 

65 

103 



37, 92 




100 


79, 


146 


100, 


138 




65 




65 


100, 107, 


108 




92 


3 


1- 79 




65 


92, 


133 


37, 


100 


55, 65, 73, 146, 


168 


55, 88 


!, 92 


31 


, 92 


92, 


148 


32, 99, 65 


, 72 


25 


, 92 


65, 


133 




92 




92 




79 




79 




65 




100 


92, 


148 




92 




103 


30, 32, 74 


, 80 




122 




100 


80, 112, 


113 




103 




80 


48 


, 65 


65, 


139 




93 




93 




80 




93 




100 




80 


25, 


48 




100 




80 




93 


34, 


80 




100 


25, 37, 48, 


66 


23, 80, 148, 


169 


39, 


80 


39, 


100 




93 


93, 


177 


80, 


131 


93, 


167 




93 




93 




81 



Oswalt, John 
Owens, Clifford 
Oyer, Russell 
Oyler, Myron 

Palacio, Gloria 
Parchment, Cecilia 
Parris, Darrell 
Passmore, Kathleen 
Paulson, Lois 
Paulson, Russell 
Paxson, Larry 
Pearson, Evelyn 
Peck, Roger 
Peck, Sara 
Pefley, Stanley 
Perkins, Sharon 
Peters, Charles 
Pettigrew, Phyllis 
Pierce, Carol 
Polsgrove, Gordon 
Pomeroy, Harold 
Prater, Carel 
Preston, Patricia 
Price, Judith 
Price, Myrna 

Rabine, Jack 
Ralston, Ruth 
Ramos, Alejandro 
Rankin, Sharlene 
Rapson, Robert 
Reasner, William 
Rechsteiner, Harvey 
Reece, J. R. 
Reece, Oris 
Rees, Elizabeth 
Reimer, Darlene 
Renouf, Ronald 
Reynolds, Jim 
Rice, Roger 
Richards, David 
Richards, Norma 
Riddle, Freda 
Rieff, Paul 
Riggle, Mary Lou 
Ringeisen, Michael 
Ringenberg, Lenore 
Ringenberg, William 
Rioux, Lorraine 
Robbins, Ken 
Roby, Mary 
Rock, Ruth 
Rogers, Grady 
Rogers, Roslyn 
Rohm, Dexter 
Rolfs, Donald 
Rolle, Nancy 
Ross, Clarence 
Roth, Wally 

Roth, Veryl 
Rowell, Wayne 
Rowley, Nancy 
Ruch, Russell 
Rumney, Thomas 
Runyon, Sally 
Rupp, Gene 
Rupp, Sharon 
Russell, Edward 

Saleska, Charles 
Sallberg, Corinne 
Samson, Wayne 
Sandstrom, Carolyn 
Schell, Glenn 38, 
Schmeltzer, Charleen 
Schug, Peter 
Schultz, Barbara 



37, 38, 100 


, 107 


, 108 




81, 93 






93 






93 




37, 






100 






66 






93 






66 






94 






81 




81 


, 146 

81 
100 
100 
100 


37, 100, 


107, 


108 




30, 


129 
100 




94,146 






66 






81 


66, 73, 


148, 


169 




39, 66 






66 




66, 


108 

81 


32, 49, 66, 73, 


148, 


168 




116, 


121 
94 




37 


', 81 
100 


101, 


140, 


175 


107, 108, 


122, 


133 




37 


, 66 
94 


101, 


107, 


108 




31 


, 94 
101 




34 


, 67 


96, 101, 


122, 


167 
81 

129 
94 

101 
81 

101 


94, 107, 


108, 


133 
101 




94, 


146 

133 


30, 32, 33, 


, 82, 


107 


108, 


141, 


166 

101 
82 


37, 56 


, 67 




82, 


148 
101 


30, 34, - 


67 




38, 


101 
94 

67 
82 


22, 88, 


94, 


133 
101 


82, 107, 108, 


110, 


111 
94 


101, 


116, 


138 
82 



195 



Quality 

Diamonds - Watches 

Jewelry - Shavers 
Pens - Pencils - Gifts 

EIKENBARY'S 

Hartford City 

Expert Watch 
Repairing 



Maintenance 
Supplies 

RIGSBE JANITOR 
SUPPLY CO. 

By-Pass at 43rd. 
Marion, Indiana 



CRYSTAL 

Rental of 
Uniforms and 
Shop Towels 

PHONE G C 2531 

Jonesboro, 

Indiana 



Ambassadors 
for Christ 

Missionary 
Organization 



Case's Pastry Shop 



Hartford City 



Indiana 



CRONIN'S DRUG STORE 

Your Rexall Store 

Prescription 
Pharmacists 

Hartford City, 
Indiana 



A 
FRIEND 



"Complete One-Stop Banking Service" 

THE CITIZENS STATE BANK 

Hartford City Indiana 



NICK'S 
DRIVE IN 

Short Orders 

Chicken 

Steak 



By-Pass 



Marion 



CHRISTY 
DRUGS 

The Prescription 

Drug Store 

Full Fountain and 

Luncheonette 

Service 

Fairmount, Indiana 

Phone Wilson 8-4820 



TAYLOR 

VARSITY 

T-CLUB 



MUSIC CLUB 

'Sing Unto 

Him a New 

Song . . ." 

Psalm 33:3 



196 



Schwarzwalder, Blanche 
Schwertfager, Larry 
Seman, Robert 
Shaffer, Nancy 
Sheets, Jean 
Sheets, Larry 
Shepherd, Gloria 
Shippy, Rosanne 
Shively, Ruth 
Short, Allan 
Shupe, Richard 
Silvis, Marlene 
Sipe, Naomi 
Skaaden, Ruth 
Slain, Larry 
Smith, Janis 
Smith, Jim 
Smith, Lois 
Smith, Maxine 
Smith, Nancy 
Smith, Raymond 
Spade, Ronald 
Sparks, Ruth 
Spear, Thomas 
Speece, Phillip 
Springer, Faith 
Stall, Patricia 
Stanich, Judith 
Starkweather, Marjorie 
Steiner, Charlotte 
Steltz, Donald 
Stephens, Frank 
Stephenson, Ralph 
Stern, Lucille 
Stockinger, Ruth 
Straubel, Nancy 
Strickten, Charles 
Stuart, Clarence 
Stubbs, Paul 
Studebaker, Margaret 
Sumney, Roland 
Sumwalt, Barbara 
Sweet, Judy 

Tao, Mitsue 
Tatem, Margaret 
Taylor, Charles 
Taylor, Marilyn 
Terdal, Leif 
Thomas, Larry 
Thompson, Dennis 
Thompson, Dolores 
Thompson, Donald 
Thompson, Irvin 

Tieszen, Lavonne 
Tillinghast, Joy 
Titus, Brian 
Tobias, Stanley 
Toland, Donald 
Tomforde, Ernest 
Townsend, Dave 
Trapp, Ronald 
Trotogot, Andrew 
Trout, Robert 
Troyer, Dorothy 
Tucker, Bernard 
Tucker, Jerry 
Tucker, Lloyd 
Turbin, Lulu 
Turner, Arthur 



56, 67 

101, 107, 108 

37, 101 

37, 101 

67, 148 

48, 67 

56, 82 

30, 34, 82 

94, 146 

94 

101 

82 

37, 53, 56, 82 

101, 116, 122, 133 

23, 83 

133, 135 

83 

55, 94, 116 

94 

B3, 1 16, 129, 131, 132 

83 

67 

67,133,139 

101, 116, 122, 133 

31, 83 

83 

101 

30, 33, 48, 83, 169 

101 



56, 69, 148 

101 

39, 101 

140 

101 

67 

39, 51, 96, 101 

37, 68, 177 

68 

102 



39, 68 

102 

102 

48, 68 

33, 83, 131 

83 

10.2, 107, 108 

56, 68 

94, 140, 177 

53, 68, 70, 107, 108 

133, 135, 141, 148 

83 

34, 48, 68 

102, 129, 143 

38 

94 

103, 122 

116 

23, 68 

84, 133, 135 

51, 102 

95, 148 

95 

102 

38, 68, 169 

84 



Turner, Clayton 
Tuttle, Kathleen 

Udisky, Barbara 
Uggen, Orville 
Ult, Edwina 

Valutis, Ronald 
Van Dam, Ron 
VanderBie, Wilma 
VanDoren, Marcia 
VanHoveln, Norma 
VanMeter, Lois 
VanValkenburg, Miriam 
Vanzant, Jane 
Volk, Neil 
Volk, Ruth 



102, 129 

84 

39, 102 

53, 84, 152, 164 

129 

68 

39, 102 

102 

25, 95 

69, 148, 167 

103, 133 
102 



Wagner, Barbara 


37, 102 


Wagner, Joseph 


23, 25, 95 


Walker, Ramona 


84 


Walsh, James 


95 


Ward, Marion 


55, 95, 144 


Warfel, Joan 


95 


Watson, Howard 


69 


Watson, Janet 


32,102 


Watson, Jean 


37, 69, 155 


Weaver, Larry 


95 


Webb, John 


107, 108 


Weber, Judith 


84 


Weeks, Alberta 


102 


Weidler, Mary 


102 


Welton, Don 




Westbrook, Joan 


56, 84 


Westlake, Caroline 


38, 39, 69 


Wetter, Nancy 


95 


Wharton, Carol 


55, 95 


Whisler, Louis 


102, 122 


Wilburn, Patricia 


95 


Wilcox, Marlene 


37, 88, 95, 166 


Wilds, David 




Wilhelm, Donna 


37 


Wilhelm, Sally 


21, 95 


Williams, Dale 


37, 95, 138 


Williams, Dwight 


102, 107, 108, 133 


Williams, Philip 


84 


Williams, Paul 


37 


Williams, Robert 




Williamson, Eddy 


102 


Wilson, Allan 




Wilson, Rowan 


107,177 


Winn, Roger 


95 


Wise, Richard 




Wittman, Nancy 


55, 84 


Woehlert, Joan 


102 


Wolfe, Robert 


34, 48, 49, 69, 73 


Worth, Ellen 


103 


Worth, William 




Wygant, Lois 


102 


Yager, Judy 




Yamauchi, June 


39, 84 


Yerks, Marilyn 


95 


Yeutter, Doralee 


95, 116 


Yoder, Devon 


95, 177 


Young, Darlene 


95 


Young, Harry 


22, 49, 53, 69, 133, 166 


Ziegler, Betty 


69 


Zigmond, Kenneth 


69 


Zikes, LaDonna 


102 


Zimmerman, Marilyn 


37, 102 



197 





Congratulations and Best Wishes 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


to the Class of '58 


Wilson Food Mkt. 


from 

THE BOOKSTORE 


Upland Indiana 


"Your Campus Shop" 




Catherine Loewen - Manager 


Hartford Hardware Co. 


GENERAL ELECTRONICS 
MFG. CO., INC. 


! General Hardware, Housewares, & Gifts 
Plumbing and Heating Contractors 


Custom-Built Custom-Built 
R.F. and I.F. Coils Solenoids and 


Paints and Appliances 


and Chokes Sub-Assemblies 


102-4 N. Jefferson Hartford City 


P. O. Box 103 — Upland, Indiana 




Lester Cale 


A. D. FREESE & SONS 


PRODUCE 


Printers - Publishers 


FANCY DRESSED POULTRY AND 


Upland, Indiana 


GRADE A EGGS 




Hartford City Indiana 


FRESHMAN CLASS 


"CHRIST OUR GUIDE" 


By Faith We Live . . . 


". . . whithersoever thou goest." 


— Romans 1:17 


— Joshua 1:9 


CLASS OF "61" 


Class of '58 



198 



FLOORS ARE PROBLEMS 

• . . everywhere! 

That's why it pays to let Huntington specialists help solve 
your floor maintenance problems. There's a tried and proved 
Huntington product for nearly every floor finishing and clean- 
ing requirement. And for the exception, there is a willingness 
on the part of Huntington Laboratories to develop the special 
product you need to get the job done correctly, at low cost. 

The result is longer wearing finishes and greater protection 
for your floors ... faster application and reduced labor costs. 



V! 



'St 



7 



B. W. BROWN, Repr. "1 

HUNTINGTON LABORATORIES rj 

Huntington, Indiana 



A 



The Upland Bank 




Friendly Financial Service 



Upland 



Indiana 




@&MS otf % 



199 



Mehling Drugs 

DRUGS - TOILETRIES 
SUNDRIES 



North Side Square 
Hartford City Indiana 



Cameras 

Photographic Supplies 

and 

Art Materials 

H e n d ey ' s 



508 S. Washington 



Marion 



Congratulations Taylor 

On New Dormitory and Food Center 
We are proud to have been selected your 
painting and decorating contractors for 
this fine addition to school. 



Tyler-Ribble Decorators 

LaFontaine, Indiana 
"Get a Job to Be Proud of" 

Fully Insured 



Phone 

Gas City 6708 

James A. Ribble 



LaFontaine YU 1-2301 
Gerald C. Tyler 



WE ARE HAPPY TO 
SERVE YOU 

Loudermilk Studio 

825 Board of Trade Bldg. 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT 

IDLE WYLD ROLLER PALACE 

Indiana's Most Beautiful Roller Rink 
Grant County's Greatest Recreation 

Skating - Tues., Fri. & Sat. Nights - 
7:30 to 10:30 



401 1 S. Meridian St. 



Marion, Indiana 



CONGRATULATIONS 
CLASS 1958 

from 

JOHNSON MACHINERY & 
PRESS CORP. 

Division of Bontrager Corp. 
Elkhart, Indiana 

Builders of Power Punch Presses 



200 




What is todays 
biggest bargain? 



Electricity 



Reddy says: "I&M electric 
rates have never been in- 
creased. If your electric bill is 
higher, it's because you're 
using electricity to take over 
so many more of your house- 
hold tasks. Actually, the more 
you use each month, the less 
you pay per kilowatthour. 
Living better electrically costs 
so little, yet means so much !" 



Indiana ^Michigan 

ELECTRIC COMPANY 



Refreshing remembrance 



AUTOGRAPHS 




Qm&i 



Bottled under authority of The Coco-Cola Company by 

COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY 

OF PORTLAND, INDIANA, INC 
510-520 East Arch St. Portland, Indiana 

Trade Mark Registered 



LINGER COMPANY 


STUDENT 


Alpha Pi lota 


Marion, Indiana 


EDUCATION 


Great Physician) 




ASSOCIATION 


Best Wishes 


YOUR RELIABLE 




to 


MECHANICAL CONTRACTOR 

PLUMBING 


Roman 1 2:1 1 


Class of 1958 






HEATING 


LEVY BROS. 




VENTILATION 


Headquarters 




AIR CONDITIONING 


for 
College Men 


A 
FRIEND 


Automatic Sprinkler Systems 


Hartford City 




Industrial Process Piping 







201 



Where Can You Find 
The Latest Campus News and Views? 






CCHO 



The Student U[ U1 1 J i of Taylor U. 



"Ye Shall Know the Truth" 



202 



Printers of the 1958 GEM 



Zke C'mcoIh Press, he 



MUNCIE, INDIANA 



,i|tn\»l* iB 



\\\% TqooV. *! 




INDIANAPOLIS 6, INDIANA 



203 



rfut<upicrfi&&